Grand Prix Sailing – fans of foiling

WASZP European Championships – Ready to take flight

Lake Garda venue for the Europeans – c Martina Orsini

 

 

In the short history of the class, the biggest ever fleet of WASZP’s will assemble at Lake Garda, Italy, from June 28th to July 1st. The European Championships to be held at Fraglia Vela Malcesine has been met with a high level of excitement and anticipation by competitors and supporters.

Over 60 WASZP’s have entered with around 70 expected for the event, this is a sensational effort for a class only two years old. One of the key elements of the WASZP which has the class thriving, is the welcoming nature and large focus on enjoyment and participation. These events are not just for the sailors, they are for friends and families to come and enjoy a four day spectacle and everything the WASZP brand has to offer.

The manufacturer offers complete support on-site with all the knowledge needed to make these boats go fast. There is also a full range of spare parts available and support is always on hand to make sure that the sailors are able to get back on the water if they have an issue. The knowledge in the fleet has come a long way in the past 12 months and everyone now has a good knowledge base to ensure their boats are fully up to speed prior to the event. There is also a three Day Camp conducted by WASZP prior to the event, this was booked out over a month before the event showing how keen the competitors are to learn about the boats.

 

Fleet at the 2017 Waszp Games at Lake Garda  – c Martina Orsini

 

Another point of difference for the class has been the experimentation with different race formats. One format that is making the sailing world sit up and take notice is the slalom event. Set-up slightly differently to the windsurfing version of this concept, the WASZPs sail through gates down-wind (more akin to downhill ski slalom). This allows the boats to pick their own line and encourage passing lanes.

We are looking forward to streaming this event live on the WASZP Games Facebook page www.facebook.com/waszpgames. All highlights of the championship racing and off water lifestyle will also be available through this page.

There are a number of quality sailors in the event, with a number of ex- Olympic sailors jumping in the WASZP due to its level playing field (One-Design) and its affordability. There is also an international flavour with 2 Australians, Jack Abbott and Tom Trotman, being joined by Bruce Curson from New Zealand. Trotman placed 3rd at the Australian Nationals whilst Abbott was 5th, Curson won the New Zealand Nationals in windy conditions. It will be very interesting how the battle between the Southern Hemisphere and Northern Hemisphere unfolds, with the 2019 WASZP Games held in January in Perth, Australia will set the scene with what is expected to be over 100 WASZPs at that event.

 

Tom Trotman at the Australian Nationals – c Martina Orsini

The WASZP is building incredible momentum with 620 boats shipped worldwide only two years after production began making it the fastest growing high performance boat in the world.

We look forward to bringing this event to a global audience from the 28th June – 1st of July!

 

WASZP update from Marc Ablett

 

 

 

GC32 World Championship at Lake Garda – Overall

 

Team Tilt – © Pedro Martinez / GC32 World Championship

 

On Lake Garda, the Schneiter family’s Team Tilt, managed by father Alex and steered by Olympic 49er sailor son Sébastien, was crowned first ever GC32 World Champion. Apart from a brief falter in the final race, the Swiss team over three days never finished a race lower than fourth, despite tricky conditions, a variety of race courses and wind strengths that Lake Garda threw at the 13 teams.

In the same year as they finished second overall on the GC32 Racing Tour in 2016, Sébastien Schneiter competed in the Rio 2016 Olympic Games and last year skippered the Swiss team in the Red Bull Youth America’s Cup. The young Team Tilt crew returned to GC32 sailing here with maturity.

“We had great team work – it worked really well on board – and short, but good preparation for this event,” explained Schneiter.

“We definitely learned a lot from the Youth America’s Cup. Here we managed to sail fast while staying calm.”

Team Tilt’s performance was all the more remarkable following a disastrous opening day that left them lying 11th overall.

“We were unlucky and we didn’t sail that well,” Schneiter admitted.

“We knew we were much better than that – we were just keen to keep racing to improve our ranking.” Incredibly, the Swiss team turned this around in just one day, leading at the end of day two.

While this was Schneiter’s first World title, this was far from the case with tactician/mainsheet trimmer Glenn Ashby, winning skipper of Emirates Team New Zealand’s in last year’s America’s Cup for whom this is his 17th World Championship title, and his first in a crew larger than two. Ashby was previously part of the Team Tilt crew in 2016.

Team Tilt also claimed the Anonimo Speed Challenge recording the highest average speed of 22.25 knots down the two reach/gybe course. This won them an Anonimo Nautilo GC32 Edition timepiece, to go with the Anonimo Nautilo Bi Color Bronze they claimed for their Championship victory.

On the final day, proceedings got underway early with one race held at 0830hrs in the northerly ‘Peler’ before competitors were sent ashore to wait for the southerly ‘Ora’ to build. After this three more races were held. Winning this morning’s race had put Jes Gram-Hansen and Rasmus Køstner’s SAP Extreme Sailing Team into the lead, but deep results in the last two races caused the Danish team to finish second by eight points. Oman Air completed the podium a further 11 points back.

Ernesto Bertarelli’s Alinghi had a mixed day but good enough to secure fourth, albeit tied on points with Ineos Rebels UK. Bertarelli was also the run-away leader in the Owner Driver Championship, finishing on 88 points to the 129 of Jason Carroll’s second placed Argo.

 

Ernesto Bertarelli and Alinghi dominated the owner-driver class – photo © Pedro Martinez / GC32 World Championship

 

Bertarelli praised the race committee for managing to get in 16 races and was proud that a Swiss team had claimed the title.

Ineos Rebels UK had a better day that caused them to gain a place on the leaderboard. Helmsman Leigh McMillan deftly threaded their black GC32 through the fleet to start on port at the committee boat three times and twice this resulted in podium finishes.

Of this first GC32 World Championship, GC32 International Class President Simon Delzoppo, skipper of.film Racing said: “It has been fantastic. We have had a wonderful event. Seeing all the boats together – it has been a great competition with lots of races in varying conditions, light conditions and winds up to 18 knots. It has been fantastic to test all the crews out in different ranges that Garda has to offer. Team Tilt was very consistent – they fought back many times and were always near the lead. They did a fantastic job.”

 

YouTube highlights 

https://www.youtube.com/watch?time_continue=4&v=lZ7houP9gAw

 

GC32 World Championship – Final Positions

1st Team Tilt 60 pts
2nd SAP Extreme Sailing Team 68 pts
3rd Oman Air 79 pts
4th Alinghi 88 pts
5th INEOS Rebels UK 88 pts
6th NORAUTO 94 pts
7th Red Bull Sailing Team 111 pts
8th Realteam 129 pts
9th Argo 129 pts
10th Frank Racing 135 pts
11th Zoulou 135 pts
12th Team México 172 pts
13th .film Racing 179 pts

 

 

Goody makes it 3 world titles in a row

 

Paul Goodison wins the Bacardi Moth World Championship 2018 © Beau Outteridge

 

 

Bacardi Moth World Championship in Bermuda 

 

For the third year in a row Paul Goodison of the UK has won the World Championship of the International Moth Class Association. Goodison, 40, achieved the feat when the final day of racing at the Bacardi Moth World Championship in Bermuda was canceled due to lack of wind.

Goodison previously won the Moth Worlds in Japan in 2016 and last year in Italy. He became the second skipper in the 77-year history of the regatta to win three consecutive titles, matching fellow British sailor David Izatt from 1979 to 1981.

“Last year’s win was very, very special because it came straight after the Americas Cup and it was against all the guys I’d been working with and sailing against,” said Goodison, who was a member of Artemis Racing during the 2017 America’s Cup in Bermuda.

“This one feels amazing as well since it’s in Bermuda where I spent so much time practicing for the last Cup,” Goodison continued. “We had some amazing conditions this week. Unfortunately, they weren’t the best conditions the last few days with the light winds, but this championship feels very special because it is the third in a row.”

Along with the three Moth World Championships Goodison has also won an Olympic Gold medal in 2008 in the Laser class and the Laser World Championship in 2009.

 

Video with Paul Goodison

https://www.youtube.com/watch?time_continue=108&v=akIk6fV1TeE

 

The weather at this regatta frustrated everyone from competitors to observers. The conditions started as fresh-to-frightening with winds of 20 to 25 knots. By the end of the week the weather pendulum swung to fair-to-fine as warm temperatures and sunny skies were abundant but not the breeze. Goodison played through it all.

“We all came here knowing some days would be bad and some days worse. For me the finest day was the first day of the Bermuda Nationals,” said Goodison in reference to racing on March 23. “The first day of the Worlds was very challenging, very windy. The next day we had four races in perfect Moth sailing weather. It’s been frustrating not to do more racing, but the racing we’ve done has been excellent.”

Francesco Bruni of Italy, a teammate of Goodison’s with Artemis Racing, placed second overall and Rome Kirby of the U.S., who sailed with Oracle Team USA last year in the America’s Cup, finished third.

 

Paul Goodison (bow 01), Francesco Bruni (bow 04) and Victor Diaz de Leon (bow 43)  – photo © Martina Orsini

 

“It’s just a dream to finish second,” said Bruni, who’ll turn 45 on April 10. “The thing that stands out most for me is we did six races in very strong wind. I was expecting to have to defend in those conditions and attack in the lighter winds. To finish second with four third-place finishes in the second day of racing is a huge achievement and very, very good for my spirit.”

For Kirby, third-place was a just result. “I was just trying to keep the boat together on that breezy first day,” said the 28-year-old. “I just wanted to stay consistent. My finishes were all second through seventh, so I had good consistency. It’s unfortunate we didn’t have more racing, but I’ll take third place.”

Andreas John won the Masters’ Division. The 57-year-old skipper from Blankeneser Segelclub on the Elbe River in Blankenese, Germany, finished 24th overall with 111 points. Among the six Masters’ entrants he finished with the low score of 7 points, good for a 4-point advantage over fellow German Kai Adolph.

Bermudian Benn Smith won the Youth Division. Representing the host Royal Bermuda Yacht Club, the 18-year-old Smith finished 31st overall with 151 points. As the lone entrant in the Youth Division he finished with 4 points.

“It’s cool, it’s special,” Smith said of his achievement. “I sail the Laser a lot and you see the top guys in the Moth have sailed the Laser. Bruni was in the Laser and Goodison won a gold medal. They’ve taken to the Moth really easily and I’d like to be like them someday.”

The 78th Moth World Championship is scheduled Nov. 19-29, 2018 and will be hosted by Mounts Bay Sailing Club on the Swan River in Perth, Western Australia. The Moth class is sponsored by Italian sportswear manufacturer Slam, which was also the official Clothing Sponsor of the world championship.

 

Final Results (Top 10 of 44 competitors, 6 races, 1 discard)

1. Paul Goodison (GBR) 1-1-(DNC-45)-1-2-1 – 6 points

2. Francesco Bruni (ITA) (13)-7-3-3-3-3 – 19

3. Rome Kirby (USA) (7)-2-6-5-5-5 – 23

4. Brad Funk (USA) 3-3-(7)-7-6-6 – 25

5. Victor Diaz de Leon (USA) 4-6-5-8-9-(10) – 32

6. Ted Hackney (AUS) 14-(15)-2-6-11-2 – 35

7. Benoit Marie (FRA) 8-4-9-10-8-(11) – 39

8. Dan Ward (GBR) 6-5-(12)-11-12-9 – 43

9. Ben Paton (GBR) (45-DNF)-24-8-9-4-7 – 52

10. Iain Jensen (AUS) 5-(45-DNC)-1-2-1-45 DNF – 54

 

More information at www.mothworlds.org/bermuda

 

 

To light to race

 

 

Day 4 racing at the 2018 Bacardi Moth World Championship Bermuda has been postponed due to light winds.

A high-pressure system has replaced the low that buffeted the island earlier in the week. While it has brought sunshine and warm temperatures, it has also strangled the wind.

“We haven’t had an average of more than 5 knots so far today and we’re expecting it to continue to drop, so we’ve postponed today’s racing,” said David Campbell-James, the principal race officer.

Tomorrow is a scheduled lay day for the regatta because of the Good Friday holiday in Bermuda. Campbell-James said that the race committee would reconvene in the morning and if there is a promise of wind the fleet will take to the racecourse.

British sailor Paul Goodison, the reigning two-time world champion, leads the regatta with six points. Francesco Bruni of Italy holds second with 19 points and Rome Kirby of the U.S. is third with 23 points.

The 77th Moth World Championship is scheduled to conclude on Sunday.

 

 

Goodison holds lead but Bruni and Kirby on the move

 

Bacardi Moth Worlds in Bermuda day 3 © Martina Orsini / www.martinaorsiniphotographer.com

 

Day 3 – Bacardi Moth World Championship in Bermuda

 

 

Paul Goodison of the U.K., Francesco Bruni of Italy and Rome Kirby of the U.S. hold first, second and third, respectively, at the Bacardi Moth World Championship in Bermuda.

Today’s conditions were far more manageable than yesterday’s blow out. But even though the northwesterly blew at a more manageable strength of 12-to-18 knots many competitors still suffered breakdowns that had them scrambling.

Goodison’s forestay broke during tune-up which forced him to miss the first race of the day. Kirby discovered a crack in his main vertical foil just before docking out. And Iain Jensen of Australia was forced to retire from Race 6, the fourth of the day, when his mainsheet broke.

“The mainsheet broke just below the splice,” said Jensen, who finished 1-2-1 in the first three races of the day. “The worst part is that I now have two discards in my scoreline, both due to rigging failures.” Jensen holds 10th overall with 54 points.

Goodison, the reigning two-time Moth world champion, leads overall with 6 points. He gave credit to Brett Moss (Brad Funk’s coach) and his girlfriend, Giulia Elba Masotto, as well as the Maguire Boats shore team for helping fix his problem expediently.

 

Francesco Bruni at the Bacardi Moth Worlds in Bermuda day 3 © Martina Orsini / www.martinaorsiniphotographer.com

 

“The forestay broke at the terminal halfway up the first tuning leg,” said Goodison. “It caused quite a bit of damage with the rig falling down and the boom getting tangled up in the fairings. Luckily, Brett and Giulia helped tow me back to shore and the Maguire Boats shore team helped get the rig out and a rope forestay in place.”

Goodison made it to the racecourse for the day’s second race, which he won, but his rigging problems persisted.

“The rope forestay kept stretching so in between Race 4 and 5 I had to go capsize the boat to try and tighten it and I missed the start of Race 5,” said Goodison.

Goodison estimates he started Race 5 30 to 40 seconds late and even though he wasn’t at 100 percent performance he kept gaining on Jensen throughout the race. The two blazed down the run to the finish line, with Goodison making big gains by sailing lower and faster. Jensen won the race, but only by one boatlength in the closest finish of the regatta to date.

“It was quite an entertaining day,” said Goodison.

 

Bacardi Moth Worlds in Bermuda day 3 © Martina Orsini / www.martinaorsiniphotographer.com

 

Bruni catapulted into second overall by posting four third-place finishes. The veteran sailor pumped his fist after each race and was clearly ecstatic with his performance, even shouting “Yeah, baby!” after one race.

“I’m very, very happy. I could not expect more,” said Bruni. “Remember, I’m almost 45 years old so to be so consistent is not easy. I gave everything I had. I have to thank my son, Bobby, and my coach, Carlo de Paoli, for helping prepare me.”

Bruni pulled off the hero move of the regatta in Race 4, the second of the day, when he executed a port-tack start at the pin end. That is one of the riskiest starts in any race, but in the Moth class the degree of difficulty is 10 because the Moth is not easily tacked. Bruni did it not once, not twice but three times.

“I saw the right corner of the racecourse looked really good and the best way to get there was the port-tack start,” Bruni said. “Sail to the right corner and tack once to the windward mark. I have to minimize my tacks because, remember, I’m 45. It worked really well. I’m very, very happy with how I managed the day.”

Kirby was lucky to discover the crack in the vertical foil that is central to the Moth’s foiling ability. “If I hadn’t found the crack the foil probably would’ve broken during racing,” Kirby said.

While many in the fleet have new boats, new sails or new equipment, Kirby is sailing the same boat he’s had for the past three years. Before the regatta he took part in two week-long training sessions in Florida with Goodison, Funk and Victor Diaz de Leon. He credited that session and his knowledge of the area for helping with his performance.

“I’m just trying to be consistent, get off the start line in good shape and stay in the top 10 at the windward mark,” Kirby said. “The racecourse today was shifty and puffy at the top, it was tough. There is some geographical stuff that I’m aware of and that probably helped me pick off a few boats. But it’s tough. My legs are shaking from all the hiking. I can barely walk.”

Racing is scheduled to continue tomorrow with the wind strength forecast between 5 and 10 knots.

 

Video highlights of day 2 

https://www.youtube.com/watch?time_continue=5&v=MM5XQq-fF18

 

Top ten provisional standings: (After 6 races, with one discard)

1. Paul Goodison (GBR) 1-1-(DNC-45)-1-2-1 – 6 points
2. Francesco Bruni (ITA) (13)-7-3-3-3-3 – 19
3. Rome Kirby (USA) (7)-2-6-5-5-5 – 23
4. Brad Funk (USA) 3-3-(7)-7-6-6 – 25
5. Victor Diaz de Leon (USA) 4-6-5-8-9-(10) – 32
6. Ted Hackney (AUS) 14-(15)-2-6-11-2 – 35
7. Benoit Marie (FRA) 8-4-9-10-8-(11) – 39
8. Dan Ward (GBR) 6-5-(12)-11-12-9 – 43
9. Ben Paton (GBR) (45-DNF)-24-8-9-4-7 – 52
10. Iain Jensen (AUS) 5-(45-DNC)-1-2-1-45 DNF – 54

Full standings

 

More info at www.mothworlds.org/bermuda

 

 

 

Paul Goodison takes early lead with two race wins

 

Paul Goodison wins both races on day 2  © Beau Outteridge / www.beauoutteridge.com

 

Bacardi Moth World Championship at the Royal Bermuda Yacht Club

 

Paul Goodison of the UK took the early lead at the Bacardi Moth World Championship in Bermuda after winning the first two races on Great Sound.

Hosted by the Royal Bermuda yacht Club, the world championship got underway a day late after yesterday was blown out. Tuesday was on the hairy edge as the wind blew steadily between 18 and 22 knots with gusts nearing 30 knots. The conditions were challenging for the sailors but left some exhilarated.

“The conditions were on the edge, pushing everyone to the limits of what’s possible in the Moth,” said the 40-year-old Goodison, the two-time Moth world champion. “But it was fantastic. So many guys were rocking around with big smiles.”

“It was super windy and pretty hairy, but the water was flat enough to get around the racecourse,” said Victor Diaz de Leon of the U.S., unabashedly the shortest sailor in the fleet. “I’ve sailed in those conditions before but it’s rare. The Moth often makes you scared, but it’s fun when you’re scared. It was a blast.”

“After the first start the breeze built from fresh to frightening,” said Irishman Dave Kenefick. “It’s the windiest I’ve ever sailed a Moth in and I’d prefer not to do it again, but I got through unscathed.”

 

 

The conditions exacted a toll on the fleet. There were broken masts, broken rudders and broken controls. Although unscathed, Kenefick wasn’t without problems.

“I had a big pitchpole just before the start of Race 1 and ripped the cleat for my ride-height control line right off the deck,” said Kenefick, who holds 13th place overall with 30 points. “I had to stop during the first upwind leg and tie the line off and I limped around the course for both races.”

Goodison didn’t suffer any breakdowns today but one of his main rivals, Iain Jensen of Australia, did. Jensen led Goodison around the first lap of Race 1, heightening the intrigue as to which of the veteran Mothists is faster.

On the second upwind leg, however, Jensen’s boom vang (the line that controls the height of the outboard end of the boom) broke. He managed to salvage a fifth in the race but then missed the second race because he returned to shore to make a repair in the hopes of returning for the third race. By that point the wind had increased and the race committee decided to postpone the rest of the day’s schedule.

 

 

“We had a good race going in the first one,” said Goodison of his duel with Jensen. “We were about the same at the first windward mark. I just got past him on the run and then had a bit of a splash down and he got past me at leeward gate. I didn’t see what happened to him on the next upwind leg, but after that I sailed pretty well.”

The course axis for both races was set at 330 degrees at a length of 1.1 nautical miles. In each race the fleet mostly took to the left side of the course. While it seemed like the water was flatter on that side, the decision to go left was out of a desire to minimise manoeuvers.

“When it’s so windy, the fewer tacks the better,” said Diaz de Leon, who holds fifth overall with 10 points. “People were mostly thinking start and go to the layline. It’s risky to tack because you don’t want to flip, and a lot of people were flipping.

“I felt good about my tacking today,” Diaz de Leon continued.” Most of my tacks were pretty nice and I think I made big gains. When you’re small you have to have good boathandling to go as fast as the big guys.”

Racing is scheduled to continue tomorrow with a forecast that calls for winds of 12 to 20 knots.

 

Day 1 video 

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=z6xmTnXBd5Y

 

More information at www.mothworlds.org/bermuda

Euroflex wins SuperFoiler Grand Prix Series

 

 

The final round of the five regatta series was held in Sydney over the weekend of 24 -25 March with Euroflex taking out the regatta, as well as the series and winning the inaugural Ben Lexcen Trophy. Tech2 was a close second, with Pavement third, followed by Record Point, iD intranet and Kleenmaid last.

Nathan Outteridge, Glenn Ashby from Euroflex, and Luke Parkinson from tech2 chatted with us about their success and the challenges of sailing the SuperFoiler.

YouTube video

https://www.youtube.com/watch?time_continue=2&v=XFcMUDwWMCg

 

 

Moth fleet set to ply Great Sound in Bermuda

 

 

 

2018 Bacardi Moth World Championship

 

An international fleet featuring the reigning two-time world champion Paul Goodison of the U.K. is set to contend the Bacardi Moth World Championship next week on Bermuda’s Great Sound.

Hosted by the Royal Bermuda Yacht Club and co-organized with the International Moth Class Association, the 77th running of the Moth Worlds is scheduled Mar. 26-Apr. 1. Prior to that the Bermuda Moth National Championship will be staged Mar. 23-24.

The Moth is a high-performance dinghy measuring 3.355m (11 feet) in length and 2.250m (7.3 feet) in beam. The hull weight ranges between 10-20kg (22-44 pounds) and it is equipped with hydrofoils that raise the hull out of the water in winds as light as 5 knots. The ideal windspeed is 8 to 12 knots, which enables the Moth to sail at 15 to 20 knots boatspeed. To watch a Moth sail past at 20 knots is to hear nothing but the sound of the wand that controls the ride height skipping off the wave tops.

Development in the class is largely open, meaning that the sailor can tinker with aspects such as the rig, hydrofoils, sail and fairleads. Sailors will spend hours determining the best lead for a control line so that it’s led to their fingertips while they’re hiking off the rack. Sailors have also been known to spend significant amounts of time redesigning the all-important hydrofoils, playing with the aspect ratio to induce more lift and reduce drag.

Paul Goodison, a member of the Artemis Racing Team for the America’s Cup last summer in Bermuda, won the Worlds last year in Italy and two years ago in Japan. He won the 2017 Worlds by a comfortable 20 points and the 2016 Worlds by a scant 3 points. Through the two victories Goodison has racked up seven race wins and 20 top-3 finishes in 24 starts.

He comes into the regatta as the decided favourite and hopes to lay waste to this year’s fleet with a new implement of destruction. Goodison took delivery of a new Kevin Ellway-designed Exocet Moth built by Maguire Boats of the U.K. at the end of January. He describes the boat as the same one with which he won the past two Worlds but with a potentially devastating development.

“It has a steeper wing bar in an effort to gain righting moment,” said Goodison. “It’s harder to sail because the angle of the bar is so steep that I’m not sliding across side-to-side like on the old boat. It’s more of an uphill/downhill action, but the benefit is more straight-line speed.”

Goodison has an added advantage in his bag of tricks: local knowledge. With Artemis Racing Goodison was a member of the weather team and he spent days on Bermuda’s Great Sound taking wind and current readings in the vicinity of where the Moth Worlds racecourse is expected to be set.

“It depends on where the race committee puts the racecourse, but I should know the area. I spent a lot of days out there,” said Goodison.

The international fleet of 45 entries includes Australians Iain Jensen and Tom Slingsby, who placed 3rd and 4th, respectively, at the 2017 Worlds, and Matt Struble of the U.S., who won the U.S. Nationals two weeks ago. The fleet counts 12 entries from Great Britain, eight from the United States and four each from Australia and Bermuda. Entries have also been received from Canada, France, Germany, Hong Kong, Ireland, Italy, Netherlands, Portugal and Switzerland. Eight sailors are racing for the Master’s title and there is one entry each for the Women’s and Youth divisions.

“The quality of the fleet is extremely high. There are some very good sailors here,” said James Doughty, President of the Bermuda Moth Class Association. “The invitationals a couple of years ago helped show the sailors how nice it is racing in Bermuda. Everyone enjoys the island and the conditions on the water.”

This is the first time that the Royal Bermuda Yacht Club has hosted the Moth Worlds. Previously it hosted Moth Invitationals in 2015 and 2016. The success of those regattas led to the Moth Class awarding the Worlds to the Royal Bermuda Yacht Club.

 

 

Locals light up Busselton leg to Ignite Championship Challenge

 

tech2 and Kleenmaid had a great round of the SuperFoiler Grand Prix in Busselton. – photo © Andrea Francolini

 

 

Two West Australian skippers have steered their teams to the podium in their home regatta with Perth’s Luke Parkinson (tech2) and Steve Thomas (Pavement) climbing onto the Busselton dais alongside Kleenmaid. tech2 secured a third victory of the regatta to claim the outright win by the slenderest of margins over Pavement.

“I loved the opportunity to be back sailing in WA over the weekend. We had a full range of conditions and this win puts us in great shape for the final in Sydney,” said Busselton’s victorious skipper Luke Parkinson – who thrust tech2 to the top for the very first time. 

“It has been a pleasure to sail in such a beautiful location, extremely tight racing it went all the way to the last run of the last race. I am really excited for the Grand Final in Sydney,” said tech2’s mainsheet hand Ayden Menzies.

In what was the most hotly contested regatta to date, Pavement finished four points behind in second.

“Pretty cool for WA to get on top at the home venue. I guess we had a lot of local knowledge,” said Pavement skipper and second on the podium Steve Thomas, “We were stoked to get second – it was a really close race between us and Kleenmaid.”

The regatta also witnessed the breakthrough podium for Olivia Price, Harry Morton and Josh McKnight – who missed out on claiming overall points by just one win. “As a team we’ve been playing the long game, slowly developing our techniques with Sydney being the end goal so this was a really important regatta for us to peak at,” said Kleenmaid mainsheet hand Josh McKnight.

The wash-up is Euroflex’s stranglehold on the championship has slipped after her last placed finish, although her star crew of Nathan Outteridge, Iain Jensen and Glenn Ashby still hold a two-point lead over tech2. It sets up a thrilling climax to the opening series with the Expr3ss! SuperFoiler Grand Final – Sydney from 23 to 25 March, 2018, to decide the first winner of the Ben Lexcen Trophy.

 

Championship Standings

Euroflex – 19 pts

Tech2 – 17 pts

Pavement – 16 pts

Record Point – 12 pts

iD Intranet – 11 pts

Kleenmaid  – 10 pts

 

Test of the wing sail for the AC75 rig

 

 

Graphic of double luffed AC75 mainsail © Bella Mente Quantum Racing

 

A small development team of Emirates Team New Zealand’s designers, shore crew and sailors, supported by Luna Rossa, North Sails and Southern Spars, have been busy developing a prototype soft wing sail and rig to be part of the AC75 class of boat to be sailed for the 36th America’s Cup in 2021.

The concept was first unveiled by Bella Mente Quantum Racing’s Terry Hutchinson during a US Sailing Leadership Forum held on February 4. Hutchinson showed a graphic with the D-shaped, square backed spar supporting two mainsails each with its own track.

It is an attempt to get the some of the benefits of a wingsail, without the need to lift the entire rig out of the boat.

The big gain is not in performance but in handling the cranky AC75’s which will have minimal stability when at rest.

The rig will enable the AC75’s to be towed in a conventional way and not using the process known as ‘sideslipping’ in the AC50’s – where in any moderate breeze or above the chase boat was strapped bow to stern with the AC50 to get the foiling catamaran back to base.

Sideslipping was required on any tow that was not into the wind, as on reaching or downwind tows the wingsail could not be feathered and would power up, taking charge of the AC50 and its chase boat.

It is a very slow process and was necessary in Bermuda in most situations to get the AC50’s back to the dock once they had entered the Royal Dockyard – requiring the 300 metres Dockyard to be closed to all other traffic to allow the AC50’s to be “tacked” into their berth by the support crews and chase boats. The process could take up to 20 minutes depending on the wind angle and strength.

The downside of the concept is the bulk contained in the double sail, which will make interesting handling by the crew. (Remembering that the sail below is only on a relatively small trimaran and not an AC75, with a mainsail luff length about three times the length of the test boat in the video.)

 

See video here:

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=IijmMB3GWic

 

 

Emirates Team NZ reported the test in social media:

“Although we have been working collectively and quietly developing this concept since last year, it is not a huge secret in terms of what we are doing because the intention is to have a tested rig and sail concept that will become part of the AC75 class rule.” said Project Co-ordinator Steve Collie.

“We have been developing this concept towards the class rule in Auckland with representation of the Challenger of Record, Luna Rossa’s designers here as part of the testing process.

The objective of the testing in Auckland is to validate a concept which the Emirates Team New Zealand designers have found to be promising in initial simulations. North Sails and veteran America’s Cup sail designer Burns Fallow has been a key part of the process from the beginning.”

“We started off back in August with a clean sheet of paper and some ideas and came up with this mainsail concept.”

“We have done enough work on it in simulation to know that it is a fast concept, but you have got to do the basic things like tack and gybe, and make the thing go up and down and just little things like that before you commit to this for the next three years.”

The concept being tested currently has a large ‘D’ shaped section mast, developed and built by Southern Spars, with separate mainsails on either side of the mast providing a smooth transition from the mast to sail in its aerodynamic shape.

“In addition to conventional mainsail trimming controls, this concept allows for twist and camber control at the head of the mainsail through a control arm on top of the rig which will be very interesting for us sailors especially transitioning back from the AC50 hard wing sails.” said Glenn Ashby.

While the hard wing sails of the AC50’s were extremely efficient, they required 20 people to launch and retrieve the wing before and after each day’s sailing.

“We want something where teams can take the mainsail down and leave the rig in at the dock as well as potentially make mainsail changes on the water, but have something that aerodynamically is superior to a conventional mainsail without being heavier.” explained Collie.

“Essentially we are looking for a new advancement in mainsail technology that we would like to think can trickle down to other boats.”

As with all America’s Cup class developments weight is always a big issue, but especially so with the AC75’s because of their self righting ability it is important to keep weight aloft to a minimum.

After a handful of days testing the roughly 1/3 scale model on Auckland Harbour the initial tests proved pretty positive for all parties involved in the project.

“To see it in reality, even in the small scale it’s a big step in our confidence, that this thing is something a bit different and should be pretty good.” concluded Fallow.

“Obviously this is a very early concept and test, but the main purpose is validate that our thinking is heading in a realistic direction. It’s huge step towards the finalisation of the class rule which is due to be released on March 31st.” said Ashby

As published in Sail-World NZ, 25 February, 2018