Monthly Archives: April 2016

Fickle Friday breeze in Hyères

 

The Sailing World Cup Hyères TPM brings together the very best international competitors over a 10 day period and, as such, it is the biggest sailing event in France in terms of participants and international representation. A veritable feast of sailing and a vital part of preparation for the Olympics, the Sailing World Cup is a flagship event attended by all the greatest athletes. SWC in figures: 10 Olympic series entered, 2 Paralympic series, 60 nations represented, 350 organisers and volunteers, 80 organiser boats, 27 international judges. image ©Jesus Renedo/Sailing Energy/World Sailing

Photos © Pedro Martinez & Jesus Renedo / Sailing Energy / World Sailing

 

 

Sailing World Cup in Hyères, France

 

Sailing World Cup Hyères served up a light dose of wind for the third day of racing but big breeze is expected to follow on Saturday.

Sailors had a short wait for breeze in the morning but a 7-8 knot southerly veering to the west came through allowing a good number of races across the ten Olympic and two Paralympic fleets.

Looking further afield and the breeze that pushed sailors to their boundaries on the opening day is to return on Saturday leading through to Sunday’s Medal Races which will be broadcast live on the World Sailing TV YouTube Channel.

 

 

Men’s and Women’s 470

Fernanda Oliveira and Ana Luiza Barbachan (BRA) have learnt to love racing in Hyères in recent years, winning the 2013 and 2015 editions of the Sailing World Cup.

“For me it’s a little bit cold,” joked Oliveira. “I prefer Rio, in Brazil, but for me it is okay. I think it is very usual event in Europe and very famous. The regatta is always crowded with good sailors. We like it, but tomorrow I might tell you differently as the Mistral is coming back.”

At present, they are on course to strike gold again, advancing to pole position after a second in the single Women’s 470 race.

The calibre of competition in Hyères is extremely high. London 2012 gold medallists Jo Aleh and Polly Powrie (NZL), 2014 and 2015 World Champions Lara Vadlau and Jolanta Ogar (AUT) and 2016 World Champions Camille Lecointre and Helene Defrance (FRA) are all on the start line vying for supremacy.

“There are a lot of good teams here,” explained Oliveira. “They are very fast, very smart and have been sailing 470s for a long time so there is a lot of experience. We are trying to do our best and we’ll have to see what happens.

“Everybody is working and trying to find the best way to get to the top and get a medal. Sometimes a team can do better and then sometimes drop.”

The pair clinched gold in the televised Medal Races in 2015 (review the race here) and after five races in 2016, they are one-point clear of Olympic silver medallists Hannah Mills and Saskia Clark (GBR).

Tina Mrak and Veronika Macarol (SLO) took the single victory on the day and occupy sixth overall.

In the Men’s 470, the dog fight between Australia’s Mathew Belcher and Will Ryan and Croatia’s Sime Fantela and Igor Marenic continued.

The pair have shared the leading positions over five races and are only separated by two points. The different between the pair was minimal in the only Men’s 470 race and the Croatians took it by just four seconds.

Belcher and Ryan lead on six points followed by the Croatians on eight. They have opened up a gap in excess of ten points over Anton Dahlberg and Fredrik Bergstrom (SWE) in third.

 

 

Hyères, France will welcome 574 sailors from 47 nations from Wednesday 27 April through to 1 May for the 2016 edition of Sailing World Cup Hyères. The third stop on the 2016 series, Hyères will host 381 boats across the ten Olympic and two Paralympic fleets and sailors will by vying for World Cup honours, national Olympic selection and a place in Sunday's televised Medal Races. ©Pedro Martinez/Sailing Energy/World Sailing

Fernanda Oliveira and Ana Luiza Barbachan (BRA)

 

 

Laser and Laser Radial

The biggest smile of the day in the Laser fleet was reserved for El Salvador’s Enrique Arathoon who snapped up a huge victory in the sixth race.

After a series of results in the mid 20s, Arathoon sprung a huge surprise taking the lead from the off and maintaining through to the finish.

“I was lucky enough to win the last race,” he said through a smile. “I started at the committee boat, I spoke with my coach and he said the right looked good and I just went for it.

“Winning was more than I expected but I managed to keep it and it was a nice race. Man it was tight. Lorenzo almost got me on the downwind so I was really nervous. I managed to stay calm and keep the boat moving fast and I made it first through.

“The best sailors of the world are here so it’s pretty tough out there. A little mistake can cost you more than usual and it’s really good to use this event to prepare for the Olympic Games.”

Arathoon sits 21st overall and aims to continue the momentum into the penultimate day in a bid to climb the leader board, “Usually I feel more comfortable in stronger breeze but doing well in the calmer breeze gives me more confidence to keep doing well in every condition.”

Tom Burton (AUS) retains the lead in the Laser and Sam Meech (NZL) climbs to second overall followed by Matt Wearn (AUS). The day’s other race win went the way of Andy Maloney (NZL) who is eighth overall and 14 points off Meech, his rival for New Zealand’s Rio 2016 Laser spot.

At the top of the Laser Radial consistency was king for the leading lights. Evi Van Acker (BEL) posted a pair of fourths and Josefin Olsson (SWE) secured two seconds. They are separated by three points. Veronika Fenclova (CZE) remains in the podium positions.

The day’s wins went the way of Maud Jayet (SUI) and Isabella Bertold (CAN).

 

Hyères, France will welcome 574 sailors from 47 nations from Wednesday 27 April through to 1 May for the 2016 edition of Sailing World Cup Hyères. The third stop on the 2016 series, Hyères will host 381 boats across the ten Olympic and two Paralympic fleets and sailors will by vying for World Cup honours, national Olympic selection and a place in Sunday's televised Medal Races. ©Pedro Martinez/Sailing Energy/World Sailing

 El Salvador’s Enrique Arathoon

 

 

Men’s and Women’s RS:X

Light breeze makes for physically demanding work for the RS:X racers. In order to move forward as fast as they can, sailors pump their sails, using all of their physical strength to obtain an advantage that propels them forward faster than their rivals.

One physically gruelling race was completed in both the Men’s and Women’s RS:X fleets.

Italy’s Mattia Camboni proved to be the king of day claiming the bullet which positions him in 15th overall. Nick Dempsey (GBR) advanced to first overall following a fifth. Trailing him is Piotr Myszka (POL) and Louis Giard (FRA).

In the Women’s RS:X, Zofia Noceti-Klepacka (POL) has a ten-point advantage over Great Britain’s Bryony Shaw (GBR). Hong Kong’s Hei Man Chan won the single race of the day and is 11th overall.

 

Finn

Brazil’s Jorge Zarif was the standout performer in the Finn, taking a first and a fifth in the light wind. He has pulled himself into contention and is just ten points off of Jake Lilley (AUS) and Oliver Tweddell (AUS) who are tied on 27 points at the top of the tree.

The Aussies are locked in a gruelling selection battle for Rio 2016. It’s anyone’s game as to who will be selected but with only the Finn Gold Cup and Sailing World Cup Weymouth and Portland remaining, time is running out for each individual to claim their worth.

Jonas Hogh-Christensen (DEN) claimed the day’s other bullet.

 

 

49er and 49erFX

Game over in the 49er? After just eight races, Peter Burling and Blair Tuke of New Zealand have opened up a 37 lead over the chasing pack.

Will and Sam Phillips (AUS) were in contention overnight but they slipped up with a 38 and a black flag. Meanwhile for Burling and Tuke it was business as usual. A first and a ninth gives them a monstrous lead which will take the pressure off in the coming days, not that there was any in the first place.

The Australian Phiilips sailors have been pulled back into a battle for the remaining medals. Jonas Warrer and Christian Peter Lubeck (DEN) are two points off them in third and five crews remain firmly in contention behind them.

Late off the water, at 19:15 local time, the 49erFX completed four races and Sweden’s Lisa Ericson and Hanna Klinga (SWE) held on with a steady day of racing. Their results, a 2-1-3-(14), leave them on 20 points, 13 clear of Annemiek Bekkering and Annette Duetz (NED). Martine Grael and Kahena Kunze (BRA) are up to third.

 

 

Nacra 17

It was a long day for the Nacra 17 as well, as the last boats reached the shore at 19:30.

Fernando Echavarri and Tara Pacheco (ESP) could not continue their stunning start and dropped from first to sixth. Four double figure scores leave them 27 points off leaders Mandy Mulder and Coen de Koning (NED).

The Dutch racers put together the best string of scores on the day, posting a 2-12-1-2 and lead Jason Waterhouse and Lisa Darmanin (AUS) by 14 points.

 

For full results see: sailing.org/worldcup

 

 

 

 

Hyères, like sailing in Rio!

 

The Sailing World Cup Hyères TPM brings together the very best international competitors over a 10 day period and, as such, it is the biggest sailing event in France in terms of participants and international representation. A veritable feast of sailing and a vital part of preparation for the Olympics, the Sailing World Cup is a flagship event attended by all the greatest athletes. SWC in figures: 10 Olympic series entered, 2 Paralympic series, 60 nations represented, 350 organisers and volunteers, 80 organiser boats, 27 international judges. image ©Jesus Renedo/Sailing Energy/World Sailing

Photos © Jesus Renedo / Sailing Energy / World Sailing

 

Sailing World Cup in Hyères, France

 

From the French Mistral to a breeze that resembled Rio de Janeiro!, Hyères turned things around for the second day of racing at the Sailing World Cup.

“Sailing in Hyères today was like sailing in Rio,” commented Swedish 49erFX leader Lisa Ericson, sailing with Hanna Klinga, “It’s shifty, it’s puffy and about having your head out of the boat.”

Rio aside, the famous Mistral that pushed sailors to their limits on Wednesday had completely died down for race day two, resulting in a wait for wind.

A building 8-10 knot breeze came through and racing kicked off just after 13:00 hrs local time resulting in a full complement of completed races.

 

 

Hyères, France will welcome 574 sailors from 47 nations from Wednesday 27 April through to 1 May for the 2016 edition of Sailing World Cup Hyères. The third stop on the 2016 series, Hyères will host 381 boats across the ten Olympic and two Paralympic fleets and sailors will by vying for World Cup honours, national Olympic selection and a place in Sunday's televised Medal Races. ©Pedro Martinez/Sailing Energy/World Sailing

Sweden’s Lisa Ericson and Hanna Klinga – Photos © Jesus Renedo / Sailing Energy / World Sailing

 

 

49er and 49erFX

The 49erFX were completely blown out on Wednesday as the wind strength was well beyond the limit for the racers. Thursday’s lighter breeze was welcomed by the sailors and they completed four good races.

Sweden’s Lisa Ericson and Hanna Klinga revelled in the conditions, picking up two bullets, a second and a tenth. They have an early advantage over Annemiek Bekkering and Annette Duetz (NED).

Twenty-four boats are racing in Hyères, four more than the size of the Rio 2016 fleet, and a number of sailors who will be on the Olympic start line are racing. The calibre of the competition resembles the Olympic Games and Ericson is just loving the competition, “This is very good preparation for Rio, we are sailing against the best people and that’s all we could ask for.”

“The pressure is off for us, we have already qualified and we will represent Sweden in Rio. It’s nice to have the pressure off and to train on things we want to focus on rather than looking at another boat.”

Ericson compared the conditions in Hyères on Thursday to those that will be present in Rio in 99 days’ time. The Rio breeze is well-known for being hard to read with shifts aplenty on the water.

Sailing World Cup Hyères is the penultimate Sailing World Cup event on the Road to Rio and if the Swedes replicate their performance in a breeze that’s similar then the future is bright.

The day’s other race wins went to Erica Dawson and Ellie Copeland (NZL) and Nina Keijzer and Claire Blom (NED) who are seventh and eighth respectively.

Peter Burling and Blair Tuke (NZL) picked up where they left off from the day prior, sailing consistently at the top of the 49er fleet.

A first, sixth and third helps them to retain their lead over Will and Sam Phillips (AUS) by three points. Jonas Warrer and Christian Peter Lubeck (DEN) are tied for third with John Pink and Stuart Bithell (GBR) on 38 points.

 

The Sailing World Cup Hyères TPM brings together the very best international competitors over a 10 day period and, as such, it is the biggest sailing event in France in terms of participants and international representation. A veritable feast of sailing and a vital part of preparation for the Olympics, the Sailing World Cup is a flagship event attended by all the greatest athletes. SWC in figures: 10 Olympic series entered, 2 Paralympic series, 60 nations represented, 350 organisers and volunteers, 80 organiser boats, 27 international judges. image ©Jesus Renedo/Sailing Energy/World Sailing

Fernanda Echavarri & Tara Pacheco (ESP) – Photos © Jesus Renedo / Sailing Energy / World Sailing

 

Nacra 17

What a difference a day makes. Just 14 of 33 boats finished the single Nacra 17 race on the opening day whilst four races on day two saw four different race winners and everyone safely across the finish line, unless they were disqualified or on the course side.

“It was more about survival than sailing,” commented Spain’s Beijing 2008 Tornado gold medallist Fernanda Echavarri, sailing with Tara Pacheco, on the day prior.

The Spanish team finished second behind Moana Vaireaux and Manon Audinet (FRA) in the single race. Echavarri continued,

“When we arrived to the course it was blowing more than the limit the class can sail in. But we were there and the Race Committee said we’re going for it. The first round was really tough and then the second round we were just surviving. I think 99% of the fleet capsized and there were many damaged boats.

“We were lucky. We didn’t take any risks because even in normal conditions you could capsize but we could finish the race without capsizing. If you don’t capsize in those conditions, it usually means you’ve had a good race. We were lucky to be one of those guys.”

Things were completely different on the second day as a lighter breeze came through but the Spaniards continued their form with four top eight finishes, leaving them eight points clear of Billy Besson and Marie Riou (FRA).

Race wins went the way of Besson and Riou, Francesco Porro and Laura Marimon Giovannetti (ITA), the Spaniards and Ben Saxton and Nicola Groves (GBR).

Laser and Laser Radial

Anne Marie Rindom (DEN) was head and shoulders above the Laser Radial fleet, posting a pair of race victories to propel her up to third overall.

The Dane struggled in the larger breeze on day one, recording an 11th and 22nd, but the lighter conditions suited her tremendously. She won the first race of the day by ten seconds over Josefin Olsson (SWE) and then killed the competition in the second, finishing more than 40 seconds ahead of overall leader Evi Van Acker (BEL).

Van Acker held onto her overnight lead with a 3-2 and Veronika Fenclova (CZE) is second overall.

Germany’s Philipp Buhl remains in first place in the Laser but he is discarding a hefty 20 points. Fortunately for Buhl, those around him also discard sizeable scores but the points remain close.

Buhl leads on 11 points, two ahead of Tom Burton (AUS) and four ahead of Nick Thompson (GBR).

 

D2 470W GBR jr

Hannah Mills and Saskia Clark (GBR) – Photos © Jesus Renedo / Sailing Energy / World Sailing

Men’s and Women’s 470

Mat Belcher and Will Ryan (AUS) retain their lead in the Men’s 470 but they didn’t have things go entirely their own way. From thriving in the Mistral the day before, they opened up their with a 17th. They hit back, though, winning the second and ending the day on four points.

Croatia’s Sime Fantela and Igor Marenic (CRO) were the kings of consistency, notching up a pair of seconds and as a result sit second.

Hannah Mills and Saskia Clark (GBR) moved into pole position in the Women’s 470, taking a sixth and a bullet. They are tied on nine points with their great rivals Jo Aleh and Polly Powrie (NZL), but lead on countback.

France’s Camille Lecointre and Helene Defrance occupy third overall, two points off the leaders.

 

Men’s and Women’s RS:X

Much like the day prior, Pawel Tarnowski (POL) had two ups and a down in the Men’s RS:X. He won the opening race, followed up with a second before a 22nd, which he discards. Nonetheless he is leading on 22 points. Nick Dempsey (GBR) and Pierre Le Coq (FRA) follow in second and third.

London 2012 bronze medallist Zofia Noceti-Klepacka (POL) grabbed the lead in the Women’s RS:X but Bryony Shaw (GBR) is hot on her heels two points behind.

Finn

Australia’s Jake Lilley did his Olympic selection chances the world of good with double bullets in the Finn. The result of his race victories is the lead in the Finn and he sits six points clear of Giles Scott’s conqueror Josh Junior (NZL).

Oliver Tweddell (AUS) remains in contention of his compatriot in third.

 

Racing resumes at 11:00 local time on Friday 29 April.

 

For full results see: www.sailing.org/worldcup

 

 

Elements at force in Hyères

 

D1 RSXW fleet jr

Photos © Jesus Renedo / Sailing Energy / World Sailing

 

Sailing World Cup in Hyères, France

 

To compete at Rio 2016, all the elements are essential, but to win, you must concentrate on one, gold.

Gold, or in its periodic table form, Au, is the one element sailors and Olympic athletes think about day and night. An Olympic gold medal is the end result of a lifetime of work but to get there, Sailing World Cup Hyères will play a key part as bragging rights, World Cup honours and national selections are on the line.

As the countdown to the Rio 2016 Olympic Games reached #100 DaysToGo, the opening day of Sailing World Cup Hyères saw sailors turn their focus to the natural elements, wind and water.

Those elements came in strong in the form of the famous Mistral. The north westerly blew up to 28 knots with a slight sea state that enabled the 470s, 49er, Finn, Laser, Laser Radial and RS:X to complete a full schedule of racing. For the 49erFX and Nacra 17, scheduled in the afternoon, the breeze was simply too strong and only the Nacra 17 completed one race. The 2.4 Norlin OD and Sonar completed a race apiece.

 

49er

On Tuesday Peter Burling and Blair Tuke (NZL) could be seen meticulously practicing their tacking and gybing in huge breeze. The fluid, continuous motions that they rehearsed on Tuesday paid dividends as they took to the top of the table after three 49er races.

A bullet and a third was the ideal start but it could have been much better as Tuke explained, “We sailed the first two races well and 99% of the third race but we capsized right at the finish which is a bit of a pain. All in all, not a bad start.”

Burling and Tuke are on a run of 25 consecutive regatta victories, remaining unbeaten in the Rio 2016 quad. As a result, they are rightly labelled as favourites for Rio 2016 gold and with 100 days to go until the Olympic Games Opening Ceremony, their run will count for nothing if they don’t take gold.

“It is exciting, 100 days to go. I saw that [World Sailing’s 100 Days to Go video] this morning on social media. It’s a good little landmark but for us, it’s business as usual and what we’ve been preparing for, for the last four years. We’re here at the World Cup event to win but Rio in 100 days’ time is fully on our mind and we’re just looking to get better.”

Their unbeaten run indicates pure perfection so how can they get better? “Well we could have been better today by not capsizing,” Tuke said through a smile.

“There’s still a lot of things that we can do better and we’re just going to look at those things, at the big picture in Rio and concentrate on getting better. Since we’ve been focusing on improving, the results have spoken for themselves.”

It is early days in the 49er and the Kiwis lead only stands at one point over Will and Sam Phillips of Australia but if they keep looking to improve then it’s going to take a special performance to overhaul them.

 

D1 49er NZL jr

 Peter Burling and Blair Tuke (NZL) – Photos © Jesus Renedo / Sailing Energy / World Sailing

 

Men’s and Women’s 470

In advance of racing at World Cup Hyères, a keen observer of Olympic sailing remarked, “if the Mistral stays like this all week, Mat and Will are going to smoke it.”

True to that, Mat Belcher and Will Ryan (AUS) did indeed smoke it in the Men’s 470 picking up a first and a third, holding the lead.

From training in Sydney, around Sydney Heads, the pair have learnt to thrive in big breeze, especially in France, winning Hyères twice and taking silver in 2015.

“Growing up in Australia we’re used to a little bit more breeze,” remarked Ryan. “The French Mistral is definitely something special. The French are probably more adapted to that, more so than we are, especially the cold weather as we can’t feel our fingers and toes sometimes.”

“We’re happy with how we are sailing and that is the main thing. We’re fresh off our Europeans and everyone is sailing the best they can, it’s going to be a long, hard couple of days.”

Luke Patience and Elliot Willis’ partnership for the Rio 2016 quad was cut short late in 2015 as Willis was diagnosed with cancer. Patience continued his journey to Rio, joining forces with Chris Grube and their progress towards Rio took a huge step forward with a first and a fifth to sit second overall, three points off the Aussie leaders.

In the Women’s 470, London 2012 Olympic gold medallists Jo Aleh and Polly Powrie (NZL) kept things tight to post a first and a second. They lead Agnieszka Skrzypulec and Irmina Mrózek Gliszczynska (POL) by four points.

 

D1 N17 tumble jr

Nacra tumbles – Photos © Jesus Renedo / Sailing Energy / World Sailing

 

Nacra 17

It was survival mode in the Nacra 17 and out of the 33 starters, just 14 finished the single race.

There was high drama as a number of boats struggled in the breeze resulting in capsizes aplenty. Moana Vaireaux and Manon Audinet of France stayed firm and took the bullet followed by Fernando Echavarri and Tara Pacheco (ESP).

 

 

Laser and Laser Radial

Matt Wearn (AUS) and Philipp Buhl (GER) took a win apiece in the Laser but it’s the German who leads. A sixth in the opening race compared to Wearn’s seventh in the second hands him the advantage.

The Laser is one of the most competitive Olympic fleets and 10 – 15 sailors have the capabilities to take the title. Six fleet races follow before Sunday’s live Medal Races and one thing’s for sure, there will be chops and changes.

Belgium’s Evi Van Acker is aiming for a third consecutive Laser Radial victory in Hyères and she’s done her chances no harm in 2016 with a first a fourth. She is a point clear of Veronika Fenclova (CZE) and three ahead of the freshly crowned World Champion, Alison Young (GBR).

 

Men’s and Women’s RS:X

It’s a tale of two ups and a down for the leaders in the Men’s and Women’s RS:X. Pawel Tarnowski (POL) in the men’s and Helene Noesmoen (FRA) in the women’s took a pair of bullets from the day’s racing however they also used their drop, discarding their 17th and a 20th respectively.

Poland’s Maja Dziarnowska is hot on the heels of Noesmoen in the women’s fleet, sitting a point behind having won the opening race. Following Dziarnowska are her compatriots Zofia Noceti-Klepacka and Malgorzata Bialecka.

In the Men’s, Tarnowski has a six-point lead over Joao Rodrigues, winner of the other men’s race.

 

The Sailing World Cup Hyères TPM brings together the very best international competitors over a 10 day period and, as such, it is the biggest sailing event in France in terms of participants and international representation. A veritable feast of sailing and a vital part of preparation for the Olympics, the Sailing World Cup is a flagship event attended by all the greatest athletes. SWC in figures:10 Olympic series entered, 2 Paralympic series, 60 nations represented, 350 organisers and volunteers, 80 organiser boats, 27 international judges. image ©Jesus Renedo/Sailing Energy/World Sailing

Celeb Paine (USA) – Photos © Jesus Renedo / Sailing Energy / World Sailing

Finn

Josh Junior (NZL) continued his winning ways from Princesa Sofia in Palma de Mallorca, Spain to take the early lead over Caleb Paine (USA) and Oliver Tweddell (AUS) after two windy races were held.

Anders Pedersen (NOR) made the most of the opening race to lead all the way to win from Jake Lilley (AUS), who moved into second place on the second upwind, overtaking Jonathan Lobert (FRA) who crossed in third.

Early on in the second race Junior was in the pack but climbed through to second on the second upwind, to take the lead on the final downwind to the finish to take the bullet from Paine and Tweddell.

 

Paralympic Events

With the wind hitting the higher limits in the Olympic classes, the Paralympic classes also fell foul with only one race completed in both the 2.4 Norlin OD and the Sonar fleets.

In the 2.4mR, the French could not take advantage of the home Hyères wind and Kevin Cantin, Xavier Dagault and favourite Damien Seguin could only manage seventh, eighth and ninth place respectively.

Australia’s Matthew Bugg took the bullet ahead of Italy’s Antonio Squizzato with Norway’s Bjonar Erikstad in third.

Great Britain’s Helena Lucas came in in fifth position while Germany’s Heiko Kroeger did not finish the race. A bad start for the German sailor means that he has less margin for error throughout the rest of the regatta than his competitors, but in the Hyères winds, anything can happen.

A bullet in the only race of the day puts Great Britain’s Hannah Stodel, John Robertson and Steve Thomas on top of the leaderboard in the Sonar fleet as four crews were either forced to retire or did not finish.

From the crews that did cross the line, France’s Bruno Jourdren, Eric Flageul and Nicolas Vimont-Vicary hold second position with Ireland’s John C Twomey, Austin O’Carroll and Ian Costelloe just behind in third.

Racing on Thurday 28 April is scheduled to start at 11:00 local time and the 49erFX and Nacra 17 fleets will catch up on their missed races.

For full results see: www.sailing.org/worldcup

 

 

Road to Rio shortening as Hyères looms

 

Hyeres FX DEN

Denmark’s Mai Hansen and Salskov-Iversen

 

Sailing World Cup in Hyères, France

 

 

World class fleets in the ten Olympic and two Paralympic events will sail in the French Riviera and four recently crowned Open European Champions will be amongst those packs. The likes of Mat Belcher and Will Ryan (AUS) and Lara Vadlau and Jolanta Ogar (AUT) will be the leading lights in the 470 and Jena Mai Hansen and Katja Salskov-Iversen (DEN) will want to continue their winning form from the 49erFX Europeans.

Peter Burling and Blair Tuke (NZL) made it 25 consecutive 49er victories at the Europeans in Barcelona, Spain. The manner in which they took victory was compelling and no one looked close to dethroning them as they extended their spellbinding run of regatta wins.

An assured performance resulted in a 60-point margin of victory over their nearest rivals in Barcelona and the 2015 Rolex World Sailors of the Year will be in Hyères for the third consecutive year aiming to make it a hat trick.

The Kiwis look unstoppable but as with any champion, there are a number of rivals waiting in the wings to pounce at any weaknesses that arise.

 

 

Hyeres 49er NZL

Peter Burling and Blair Tuke (NZL)

 

 

Denmark’s Beijing 2008 Olympic gold medallist Jonas Warrer knows what it takes to win and will be joined by Christian Peter Lübeck in Hyères. Further contenders include Spain’s Diego Botin and Iago López Marra who won gold at World Cup Miami, Princesa Sofia Regatta winners Ryan Seaton and Matthew McGovern (IRL) as well as the ever present Austrians Nico Delle-Karth and Nikolaus Resch.

In comparison to the 49er, the 49erFX is one of the most open Olympic disciplines as of late with a wide array of regatta winners.

Denmark’s Mai Hansen and Salskov-Iversen put their name into the hat as Olympic contenders with a win at the Europeans, their first major 49erFX victory. They will be making the short trip from Barcelona to Hyères for what promises to be a highly competitive competition that features three of four 49erFX World Champions since the class was introduced into the Olympic program in 2012.

The inaugural world championship, held in Marseille, France in 2013 saw Alex Maloney and Molly Meech (NZL) walk away with the title. A year later and Brazil’s Martine Grael and Kahena Kunze took the honours and they were followed by Giulia Conti and Francesca Clapcich (ITA) in 2015. All three are Olympic podium contenders but no single partnership has been able to position themselves as favourites for Olympic glory.

Hyères will give followers a further indicator in what has so far proven to be a compelling up and down 49erFX narrative.

The 470 European Championship concluded shortly before the 49er/ 49erFX edition in Palma de Mallorca, Spain and it was business as usual as far as Australia’s Belcher and Ryan and Austria’s Vadlau and Ogar were concerned.

Both teams left Palma with gold medals around their neck and will be taking them to Hyères, where fleets of 40 in both the men’s and women’s division wait.

Sime Fantela and Igor Marenic (CRO) have been the only team to overhaul Belcher and Ryan when push comes to shove. The Croatians halted them in their tracks at World Cup Hyères in 2015, claiming gold and they ended their run of world championship victories in Buenos Aires, Argentina this year.

The Croatian, Australian rivalry when the gun goes for the first Men’s 470 race. Further contenders include Stu McNay and Dave Hughes (USA), Lucas Calabrese and Juan de la Fuente (ARG) and Luke Patience and Chris Grube (GBR).

Joining Vadlau and Ogar in the Women’s 470 will be defending Hyères champions Fernanda Oliveira and Ana Luiza Barbachan (BRA), 2016 world champions Camille Lecointre and Helene Defrance (FRA) as well as Olympic champions Jo Aleh and Polly Powrie (NZL).

 

Aquece Rio – International Sailing Regatta 2015 is the second sailing test event in preparation for the Rio 2016 Olympic Sailing Competition. Held out of Marina da Gloria from 15-22 August, the Olympic test event welcomes more than 330 sailors from 52 nations in Rio de Janeiro, Brazil. Credit Jesus Renedo/Sailing Energy

Billy Besson and Marie Riou – Photo c Jesus Renedo / Sailing Energy

 

French masters set to star in Hyères

 

France’s Olympic hopefuls will be aiming to sign off before the Rio 2016 Olympic Games with a bang on their home waters at Sailing World Cup Hyères.

Billy Besson and Marie Riou in the Nacra 17 and the RS:X racers, Pierre Le Coq and Charline Picon, have enjoyed significant success in the Rio 2016 quadrennial and are viewed as firm favourites at Rio 2016.

Besson and Riou have emerged as the masters of the Nacra 17, sailing faster than any of their rivals culminating in four consecutive world championships.

No sailor had achieved the fabulous four in an Olympic quad in advance of Rio 2016 and much like waiting for buses, two came at the same time as Peter Burling and Blair Tuke (NZL) achieved their fourth in the 49er.

But unlike the Kiwis, the French do have some weaknesses in their armour.

They were beaten to second by Jason Waterhouse and Lisa Darmanin (AUS) on Olympic waters at the 2015 Olympic test event and recently finished all the way down in 16th at Sailing World Cup Miami. Unlike the superheroes that are Burling and Tuke, it proved that Besson and Riou are human after all.

When it comes to racing in Hyères, Besson and Riou have enjoyed great success. They finished second in 2013 and 2014 before winning it for the first time in 2015. Their performances indicate that their Olympic selection is all but confirmed and Hyères in 2016 will give them the opportunity to showcase their credentials in advance of the Olympic Sailing Competition.

Two sailors confirmed by their National Olympic Committee for Rio are Australia’s Waterhouse and Darmanin. The cousins were outstanding at the 2015 test event, taking gold to confirm their Olympic status. Without the pressure of internal qualification they have been able to relax and test different set ups on their Nacra 17.

Several weeks has passed since their last outing, the Nacra 17 World Championships, and Hyères will enable them to test themselves against Besson and Riou and the world class fleet that is assembling.

Santiago Lange and Cecilia Carranza Saroli (ARG), 2014 Hyères victors Vittorio Bissaro and Silvia Siciouri (ITA), Miami winners Mandy Mulder and Coen de Koning (NED) and Kiwi hopefuls Gemma Jones and Jason Saunders will all be in the hunt for medals.

 

Aquece Rio – International Sailing Regatta 2015 is the second sailing test event in preparation for the Rio 2016 Olympic Sailing Competition. Held out of Marina da Gloria from 15-22 August, the Olympic test event welcomes more than 330 sailors from 52 nations in Rio de Janeiro, Brazil. Credit Jesus Renedo/Sailing Energy

France’s Charline Picon – Photo c Jesus Renedo / Sailing Energy

 

In the RS:X, France’s Charline Picon has picked up two Olympic test event gold medals as well as 2014 World and European titles. As the only sailor to claim an RS:X Women’s gold medal at the two test events Picon is a resounding favourite for gold. However, what she lacks in the current quadrennial is gold at her home world cup.

She came close in 2013 with bronze and even closer in 2015 with silver but the golden finish is missing. However, it’s no foregone conclusion that a further update is coming. World class opposition including World #1 and 2015 Hyères gold medallist Lilian de Geus (NED), 2016 world champion Malgorzata Bialecka (POL) and London 2012 gold medallist Marina Alabau (ESP) will all be on the start line.

Much like Picon, compatriot Pierre Le Coq in the Men’s RS:X has tasted success on Olympic waters. Two podium finishes, second in 2014 and third in 2015, at the Olympic test events alongside a world championship gold in 2015 position him as a contender for an Olympic medal.

The young Frenchman picked up gold in the Men’s RS:X in an elite fleet in Hyères last year and will be joined by a stellar cast of RS:X racers once again in Hyères.  2016 world champion Piotr Myszka (POL) and seven of the world’s top ten will all be in attendance.

The Laser and Laser Radial will be made up of many leading contenders. 2015 winners Tom Burton (AUS) and Evi Van Acker (BEL) will spearhead their respective fleets. In the Finn, London 2012 bronze medallist Jonathan Lobert (FRA) will make his first regatta appearance of 2016. He signed off 2015 with silver at the Finn Gold Cup in Takapuna, New Zealand and he will be joined by London 2012 silver medallist Jonas Hogh Christensen (DEN) and Princesa Sofia winner Josh Junior (NZL).

Racing at 2016 Sailing World Cup Hyères is scheduled to commence on Wednesday 27 April. Four days of fleet racing will culminate in the Medal Races on Sunday 1 May which will be broadcast live on the World Sailing TV YouTube channel from 11:00 hrs local time.

 

 

 

Britains Alison Young wins Laser Radial Worlds in Mexico

 

D6 GBR AY win

Photo © www.JLDigitalMedia.net

 

Laser Radial Women’s Worlds at Puerto Vallarta, Mexico – Overall

 

Alison Young has become the first British woman to win a World Championship title in a solo Olympic dinghy class.

2012 Olympian Young, whose previous World Championship best was fourth in 2012, claimed an emphatic last race victory over USA’s Paige Railey to seal Laser Radial World Championship glory in Vallarta, Mexico, on Wednesday (20 April) and provide a huge boost to her Rio preparations with 107 days to go until the 2016 Opening Ceremony.

After a hard-fought regatta where the overall lead changed daily, it all came down to just a single point in the end. The 28-year-old Young held her nerve to take her third race win of the week in the 13th and final race of the regatta, relegating erstwhile leader Railey into the silver medal position by the narrowest of margins.

“It was pretty tense in that last race!” admitted Young, who finished fifth at her Olympic debut in 2012 and is already selected for Rio. “I managed to lead all the way round and I was lucky to have done enough overall.”

“I’ve sailed pretty consistently through the week and it’s been super-tight racing all the way through. Going into today, four or five people could have won the Championships, which is the nature of Laser racing.

“It’s really pleasing to have stayed consistent and kept executing towards what we’ve been working on, and for it all to come through in the end.”

Shirley Robertson claimed 2000 Olympic gold in the Europe class, which was then the women’s one-person Olympic dinghy, but a World Championship title in that event eluded her. The Laser Radial has since replaced the Europe on the Games programme, and Young becomes the first female British sailor to win a World Championship in an Olympic single-handed dinghy event. Penny Way won windsurfing World Championship gold in 1990.

“It’s pretty cool!” said Young of her achievement. “But we’ve also won Olympic medals in the women’s single-handed classes in the past so that’s the next target.”

“It’s a great confidence boost [ahead of Rio], but ultimately this year is about the Games,” continued Young.

“There’s still plenty of room for improvement and I know that come the Games there’s going to be seven or eight girls battling it out hard for the medals so it’ll be a case of executing well come that regatta.”

Anne-Marie Rindom (DEN) moved up to third, followed by Marit Bouwmeester (NED), who dropped to fourth after a disappointing first race, and Gintare Scheidt (LTU) in fifth.

This event is followed by several other Laser World Championships, all hosted by the Vallarta Yacht Club.

 

Overall Standings (Top 10 after 13 races)

1st GBR Alison Young -11 1 7 6 2 4 3 3 1 9 -33 5 1 – 42 pts

2nd USA Paige Railey -9 3 4 3 1 1 7 -9 5 2 5 6 6 – 43 pts

3rd DEN Anne-Marie Rindom -27 6 3 5 4 2 -8 6 3 4 8 4 5 – 50 pts

4th NED Marit Bouwmeester -17 1 1 1 1 3 2 17 2 6 17 -19 3 – 54 pts

5th LTU Gintare Volungeviciute Scheidt 8 2 4 2 6 -9 2 1 18 5 19 1 -25 – 68 pts

6th USA Erika Reineke 3 2 3 3 7 (37.0 BFD) 5 18 -25 7 21 11 4 – 84 pts

7th CHN Lijia Xu 1 8 -19 4 7 17 1 16 9 -25 23 2 2 – 90 pts

8th TUR Nazli Cagla Donertas 11/RDG -17 17 8 3 6 15 7 6 13 9 3 -21 – 98 pts

9th JPN Manami Doi -13 10 5 11 4 4 1 10 14 14 -25 13 15 – 101 pts

10th CAN Brenda Bowskill 8 -25 9 10 2 2 4 12 7 11 -26 26 18 – 109 pts

 

 

Full results from the 2016 Laser Radial World Championship here.

 

 

Final series slowly edging to a conclusion

 

D4 NED

Photo © www.JLDigitalMedia.net

 

Laser Radial Women’s Worlds at Puerto Vallarta, Mexico

 

Day 5 – Monday

It took five attempts, but Race 8, the first race of the Finals Series, started just before 1430h under clear skies on Banderas Bay. The first attempt led to a general recall, but the three subsequent attempts faltered when the Race Committee postponed during the starting sequence as the wind shifted, finally settling in from the southwest.

The wind direction remained mostly steady, and built as the afternoon progressed. The course layout didn’t change during the afternoon’s racing, but oscillations around the average led to gains and losses for most sailors. Several of the top ten competitors ended up using Race 9 as their single discard.

At the end of day one of the final series, Alison Young (GBR) leads the pack, followed by Marit Bouwmeester (NED), Paige Railey (USA), Gintare Scheidt (LTU), and Anne-Marie Rindom (DEN).

 

D5 GBR AY

 

Day 6 – Tuesday

Finishing in the top five in both races, Paige Railey (USA) moved up to claim the lead in the Gold fleet at the end of day 6. Marit Bouwmeester (NED) remains in second, followed by Alison Young (GBR), Anne-Marie Rindom (DEN), and Gintare Scheidt (LTU).

Race 10 started in 8-10 knots of a southwesterly breeze under mostly clear skies on Banderas Bay. The first start in the Gold fleet led to a general recall, but they started cleanly under a black flag on the second attempt.

The breeze built to 16, knots as the afternoon progressed. The stronger breeze led to larger waves, benefitting those sailors who could best work the waves.

The start of Race 11 was delayed as the westerly wind settled in. But clouds began to appear, and the wind began to fade so the race committee shortened the race after the second windward leg.

Wednesday is the final day of the competition, with two races scheduled. At the end of the day, the Laser Radial class will have a new women’s world champion.

 

 

D6 USA

 

 

Full results at www.laserworlds2016.org/index.php/competitors-2/laser-radial-women

 

 

Augie Diaz & Bruno Prada win Star Worlds in Miami

 

Augie Diaz & Bruno Prada

Photo © Marco Oquendo / www.imagesbymarco.com

 

Star World Championship at Coral Reef Yacht Club in Miami

 

 

The final race of the Star Worlds 2016 was crucial as there were five contenders in the running and only one point between first place, Diego Negri & Sergio Lambertenghi and second place, Augie Diaz & Bruno Prada.

Light winds on Biscayne Bay delayed the start of the last day of races, but at 12.30pm, the wind climbed to 7 knots and the Race Committee completed the sixth race, as scheduled.

After four attempts the Race Officer ordered a black flag and the start was good except for ten Star sailors that were over.

 

Star Worlds fleet D3

 

The battle began at the starting sequence when Augie Diaz and Diego Negro chased each other fighting for the control of the start line.

A pack of boats arrived at the windward mark with Paul Cayard leading. Brian Ledbetter was winning the regatta with a mid-fleet position because Augie and Diego where far behind in the sixties.

The day was a shifty one so concentration and patience were required for the entire race. The Race Committee had to call for a change of course for several of the legs during the afternoon as the wind oscillated first to right and then to left in this position changing game.

On the third leg, Augie Diaz & Bruno Prada did a great job reading the shifts recovering from a 60th to a 7th by the second windward mark.

 

Star Worlds fleet D4

 

From there, it was all about tactics as Diego was close behind them. The US Team pushed Diego and Sergio to the wrong side resulting in Diego finishing 7th and Augie finishing 5th.

The points were just enough for Augie and Bruno to be crowned Star World Champions.

Luke Lawrence & Ian Coleman won the last race of the Worlds with Paul Cayard close behind them.

Angie summed up the last race: “An incredible feeling!!! Not sure if I deserve it, but I take it. We did a great job the last race. Bruno did an outstanding job of coming back, time after time, after we have gain big advantages. In fact, in the middle of the last windward leg I thought that Diego was winning the worlds, because we had a big right shift and we went a very far right and he was right behind us and we won, he got second, so he would win the worlds. I just feel very fortunate, it’s a group of elite sailors that I really don’t know if I belong to but I am very very happy, it’s a great feeling to be a World Champions.”

And he affirms that Bruno Prada is a Gold Medal Maker.

For Bruno Prada this is the fourth World Championship Title after sailing with the Olympic Medallist, Robert Scheidt. He has been sailing with Augie for seven years and he feels that a dream came true:

“One of my big achievements was winning a Worlds with Augie Diaz. To win a Star World Championship you have to be in a special week and definitely we were in this special week. We started doing good races, getting confident and for a reason that I cannot explain, some energy, everything that we do worked well. It’s a little bit of plan it but sometimes you plan it and it doesn’t work.”

For full results see: www.starworlds2016.com

 

 

Marit Bouwmeester finds her mojo

 

D3 NED

Photo © www.JLDigitalMedia.net

 

 

Laser Radial Women’s Worlds at Puerto Vallarta, Mexico

 

 

The regatta is back on schedule despite a late start due to light, midday winds, the Race Committee re-sailed the race that was abandoned yesterday (R4-Blue) and completed both races scheduled for today (R5 & R6 for both the Yellow & Blue fleets).

Race 4 for yesterday’s Blue fleet started cleanly in a southwesterly breeze of 8 knots and clearing skies.  The wind filled, and clocked right about 10 degrees, before R5 started cleanly for the Yellow fleet.  A general recall, leading to a restart, held back the start of the race for the Blue fleet.  Fleet splits were based on results through Race 3, from yesterday.

The wind continued to build as the skies cleared, reaching about 15 knots in the late afternoon.  Both fleets completed Race 6, despite several general recalls, although this kept the competitors (and the race committee!) on the water into the early evening.

Saturday’s results have shuffled the top of the score sheet, and, with five races completed, each competitor can discard one race from the total score.

Marit Bouwmeester (NED) has moved to the top, with four wins and the discard of her high finish in the first race.  Paige Railey (USA) has moved up into second.  Her teammate, Erika Reinecke (USA), the previous regatta leader, used her discard for the over-early disqualification from one of today’s races.

Sunday (Day 4) is the final day of qualifying races, which determines the split between the Gold and Silver fleets for the remaining three days of the competition.

 

Overall Standings – (Top 6 after 6 races) (71 entries)

1st NED Marit Bouwmeester -17 1 1 1 1 3 24 7 pts

2nd USA Paige Railey -9 3 4 3 1 1 21 12 pts

3rd USA Erika Reineke 3 2 3 3 7 (37.0 BFD) 55 18 pts

4th GBR Alison Young -11 1 7 6 2 4 31 20 pts

5th DEN Anne-Marie Rindom -27 6 3 5 4 2 47 20 pts

6th LTU Gintare Volungeviciute Scheidt 8 2 4 2 6 -9 31 22 pts

7th ARG Luca Falasca 4 -12 2 7 11 1 37 25 pts

 

 

Hansen and Iversen claim first European title

 

MR DEN win tm

Jena Hansen and Katja Iversen – Photos © Tomas Moya

 

49er & 49erFX European Championship at Barcelona – Overall

 

Sometimes a regatta can come down to a moment, and for Jena Hansen and Katja Iversen they seized the moment and claimed their first ever European title. The Danish duo trailed Italians and reigning European Champions Giulia Conti and Francesca Clapcich by four points entering the medal race, meaning they had to beat the Italians and put one boat in between them.

On the first beat, the right was favored and the whole fleet headed that way, with the Danes in second following the British, but critically, with the Italians just on their windward hip. After a long drag race where the Danish sailed a fairly high line, the Italians had held on, but were just behind. As the British tacked on what appeared to be the layline, the Danes and Italians had critical decisions to make.

“We were happy to see the British boat there as we thought they might need to be the boat we pass to get a boat in between,” said Katja Iversen. “When they tacked, the layline looked close, but we wanted to tack underneath in case we could make it and we didn’t want to give the opportunity to the Italians. We pulled off the tack and Conti did the same, but we and the British were too far ahead, so we could roll them and they ended up having to do two more tacks, giving us the gap we needed.”

In that moment, the Italians fell from third, a regatta winning position, to seventh by the windward mark. They fought bravely back through the race, but could only catch two of the boats and needed to settle for Silver. The Italian disappointment was evident, “There will be no more chances to be European Champions, as we retire after the games,” said a clearly disappointed Conti. Her team mates consoled her, all knowing there would be the greater prize to shoot for on the horizon in Rio.

This medal race marks the second in a row that has not gone well for the Italians, who took a terrible turn in the 2016 49erFX World Championship in Clearwater and got stuck in a hole for 5 minutes while the rest of the fleet continued passed them. The race today was lost in a much more typical fashion, but is no less heartbreaking.

Elated by the finish were 2016 World Champions Tamara Echegoyen and Berta Betanzos, ended up tied with the Argentinian crew of Vicky Travascio and Sol Branz on 101 points, but claim the Bronze medal by having the better medal race position. The Spanish team were leading the regatta after day four, but had two poor days in a row to drop out of the hunt for the win, so were happy to bounce back and claim a medal on home waters.

 

MR ESP win tm

Diego Botin and Iago Lopez

 

Home waters were good to Spaniards this week, as Diego Botin and Iago Lopez also claimed the Bronze medal in a great medal race performance for them. These young guns have been on the rise for all of 2016, up to fifth during the 2016 World Championships before their team mates match raced them back due to an internal trials, a third place finish in Palma, and now a Bronze medal at the European Championship and the top European at the European Championship.

Out in front were Peter Burling and Blair Tuke, ever present champions in the 49er, followed by Nathan Outteridge and Iain Jensen, who sailed very cleanly into the Silver medal position and are gearing up for another big run with only four months to go until Rio.

 

 

 

Burling and Tuke secure fourth straight open European title

 

The Kiwi sensations, Peter Burling and Blair Tuke wrapped up their 4th straight Open European Championship and 25th straight 49er regatta by a huge margin. The duo lead the regatta from start to finish, and never looked within the reach of any challengers.

The sailing world is already infatuated with these super performers. To dominate an Olympic class in this manner is rare, to do so while also winning Moth, A-Cat, and America’s Cup titles at the same time is truly novel. The pair are always around the boat park, part of the community, but such a cut above the rest that they are a constant source of discussion and amazement.

 

MR NZL champs tm

Peter Burling and Blair Tuke

Locking in the Silver medal are Nathan Outteridge and Iain Jensen, on better form this regatta from start to finish than the recent past. The Aussie pair started the regatta well and tried to lock up with Burling and Tuke during races. They often started just to windward on the start line of the Kiwis to get a sense of just how large the speed gaps might be and how much work there is to reverse fortunes by August. There will be many doubters that it’s even possible to beat Burling and Tuke these days but in an Olympic environment, with fewer races, really unpredictable conditions, and distractions all over the Olympics are no sure bet despite how it may look.

Austria’s Nico Delle Karth and Niko Resch took a fair lead over the Brits and Spanish in to the medal race, which they had to defend to become the top Europeans at the European Championship.

However the Austrians had a bad medal race finishing in 10th place whilst the Spanish young guns Diego Botin and Iago Lopez sailed a blinder to finish fourth and snatch the bronze medal and coveted first European title by a margin of four points. John Pink and Stu Bithell finished a solid third in the medal race to secure fifth overall but even more importantly top of the Brits and only British sailors to make the medal race line up. This will add pressure on the British selectors in their agonising decision as to which sailors to send to Rio in August.

The next regattas for most of these teams are the Sailing World Cup in Hyeres in late April and the 49er and 49erFX South American’s in Rio, July 11-14th.

 

Results, photos, tracking, video, and more 49er.org/2016-european-championship

 

 

More light airs and only one more race

 

D2 fleet

Photo © www.JLDigitalMedia.net

 

Laser Radial Women’s Worlds at Puerto Vallarta, Mexico

 

Both qualifying fleets completed one of the two scheduled races today, but the second race of the Blue fleet was abandoned as the wind died in the late afternoon. This race will be re-sailed tomorrow.

Light winds delayed the start of the first race until just before 1400 hrs, only an hour after the scheduled time. The breeze increased through the afternoon, and shifted several times, as low clouds approached. But as the clouds passed, they took the wind with them. Race Committee abandoned that race as the wind continued to decrease.

But with one more completed race for both fleets, Erika Reinecke (USA) maintained her lead with a third place finish. Isabella Maegli (GUA) and Lijia Xu (CHN) dropped back, allowing Gintare Scheidt (LTU) to move up into second place, followed by Paige Railey (USA). But it is still early in the event, and there are many more races to be sailed.

Overcast skies, and less than typical winds are expected for the next day or two. After that, the organizers and competitors are looking forward to clear skies, and building thermals, and the racing should be even more exciting!

 

Standings (Top 10 after 3 races)

1 USA 184454 Erika Reineke 3 2 3 – 8 pts

2 LTU 202750 Gintare Volungeviciute Scheidt 8 2 4 – 14 pts

3 USA 197111 Paige Railey 9 3 4  – 16 pts

4 ARG 205491 Luca Falasca 4 12 2 – 18 pts

5 NED 206333 Marit Bouwmeester 17 1 1 – 19 pts

6 GBR 202411 Alison Young 11 1 7 – 19 pts

7 AHO 206719 Philipine Van Aanholt 3 14 2 – 19 pts

8 NOR 209759 Tiril Bue 9 4 11 – 24 pts

9 CHN 200041 Min Gu 4 8 13 – 25 pts

10 URU 204452 Dolores Moreira Fraschini 2 15 10 – 27 pts

 

See the event website for results, photos, and video at www.laserworlds2016.org/index.php/competitors-2/laser-radial-women