Johno Fullerton

Goodison holds lead but Bruni and Kirby on the move

 

Bacardi Moth Worlds in Bermuda day 3 © Martina Orsini / www.martinaorsiniphotographer.com

 

Day 3 – Bacardi Moth World Championship in Bermuda

 

 

Paul Goodison of the U.K., Francesco Bruni of Italy and Rome Kirby of the U.S. hold first, second and third, respectively, at the Bacardi Moth World Championship in Bermuda.

Today’s conditions were far more manageable than yesterday’s blow out. But even though the northwesterly blew at a more manageable strength of 12-to-18 knots many competitors still suffered breakdowns that had them scrambling.

Goodison’s forestay broke during tune-up which forced him to miss the first race of the day. Kirby discovered a crack in his main vertical foil just before docking out. And Iain Jensen of Australia was forced to retire from Race 6, the fourth of the day, when his mainsheet broke.

“The mainsheet broke just below the splice,” said Jensen, who finished 1-2-1 in the first three races of the day. “The worst part is that I now have two discards in my scoreline, both due to rigging failures.” Jensen holds 10th overall with 54 points.

Goodison, the reigning two-time Moth world champion, leads overall with 6 points. He gave credit to Brett Moss (Brad Funk’s coach) and his girlfriend, Giulia Elba Masotto, as well as the Maguire Boats shore team for helping fix his problem expediently.

 

Francesco Bruni at the Bacardi Moth Worlds in Bermuda day 3 © Martina Orsini / www.martinaorsiniphotographer.com

 

“The forestay broke at the terminal halfway up the first tuning leg,” said Goodison. “It caused quite a bit of damage with the rig falling down and the boom getting tangled up in the fairings. Luckily, Brett and Giulia helped tow me back to shore and the Maguire Boats shore team helped get the rig out and a rope forestay in place.”

Goodison made it to the racecourse for the day’s second race, which he won, but his rigging problems persisted.

“The rope forestay kept stretching so in between Race 4 and 5 I had to go capsize the boat to try and tighten it and I missed the start of Race 5,” said Goodison.

Goodison estimates he started Race 5 30 to 40 seconds late and even though he wasn’t at 100 percent performance he kept gaining on Jensen throughout the race. The two blazed down the run to the finish line, with Goodison making big gains by sailing lower and faster. Jensen won the race, but only by one boatlength in the closest finish of the regatta to date.

“It was quite an entertaining day,” said Goodison.

 

Bacardi Moth Worlds in Bermuda day 3 © Martina Orsini / www.martinaorsiniphotographer.com

 

Bruni catapulted into second overall by posting four third-place finishes. The veteran sailor pumped his fist after each race and was clearly ecstatic with his performance, even shouting “Yeah, baby!” after one race.

“I’m very, very happy. I could not expect more,” said Bruni. “Remember, I’m almost 45 years old so to be so consistent is not easy. I gave everything I had. I have to thank my son, Bobby, and my coach, Carlo de Paoli, for helping prepare me.”

Bruni pulled off the hero move of the regatta in Race 4, the second of the day, when he executed a port-tack start at the pin end. That is one of the riskiest starts in any race, but in the Moth class the degree of difficulty is 10 because the Moth is not easily tacked. Bruni did it not once, not twice but three times.

“I saw the right corner of the racecourse looked really good and the best way to get there was the port-tack start,” Bruni said. “Sail to the right corner and tack once to the windward mark. I have to minimize my tacks because, remember, I’m 45. It worked really well. I’m very, very happy with how I managed the day.”

Kirby was lucky to discover the crack in the vertical foil that is central to the Moth’s foiling ability. “If I hadn’t found the crack the foil probably would’ve broken during racing,” Kirby said.

While many in the fleet have new boats, new sails or new equipment, Kirby is sailing the same boat he’s had for the past three years. Before the regatta he took part in two week-long training sessions in Florida with Goodison, Funk and Victor Diaz de Leon. He credited that session and his knowledge of the area for helping with his performance.

“I’m just trying to be consistent, get off the start line in good shape and stay in the top 10 at the windward mark,” Kirby said. “The racecourse today was shifty and puffy at the top, it was tough. There is some geographical stuff that I’m aware of and that probably helped me pick off a few boats. But it’s tough. My legs are shaking from all the hiking. I can barely walk.”

Racing is scheduled to continue tomorrow with the wind strength forecast between 5 and 10 knots.

 

Video highlights of day 2 

https://www.youtube.com/watch?time_continue=5&v=MM5XQq-fF18

 

Top ten provisional standings: (After 6 races, with one discard)

1. Paul Goodison (GBR) 1-1-(DNC-45)-1-2-1 – 6 points
2. Francesco Bruni (ITA) (13)-7-3-3-3-3 – 19
3. Rome Kirby (USA) (7)-2-6-5-5-5 – 23
4. Brad Funk (USA) 3-3-(7)-7-6-6 – 25
5. Victor Diaz de Leon (USA) 4-6-5-8-9-(10) – 32
6. Ted Hackney (AUS) 14-(15)-2-6-11-2 – 35
7. Benoit Marie (FRA) 8-4-9-10-8-(11) – 39
8. Dan Ward (GBR) 6-5-(12)-11-12-9 – 43
9. Ben Paton (GBR) (45-DNF)-24-8-9-4-7 – 52
10. Iain Jensen (AUS) 5-(45-DNC)-1-2-1-45 DNF – 54

Full standings

 

More info at www.mothworlds.org/bermuda

 

 

 

Paul Goodison takes early lead with two race wins

 

Paul Goodison wins both races on day 2  © Beau Outteridge / www.beauoutteridge.com

 

Bacardi Moth World Championship at the Royal Bermuda Yacht Club

 

Paul Goodison of the UK took the early lead at the Bacardi Moth World Championship in Bermuda after winning the first two races on Great Sound.

Hosted by the Royal Bermuda yacht Club, the world championship got underway a day late after yesterday was blown out. Tuesday was on the hairy edge as the wind blew steadily between 18 and 22 knots with gusts nearing 30 knots. The conditions were challenging for the sailors but left some exhilarated.

“The conditions were on the edge, pushing everyone to the limits of what’s possible in the Moth,” said the 40-year-old Goodison, the two-time Moth world champion. “But it was fantastic. So many guys were rocking around with big smiles.”

“It was super windy and pretty hairy, but the water was flat enough to get around the racecourse,” said Victor Diaz de Leon of the U.S., unabashedly the shortest sailor in the fleet. “I’ve sailed in those conditions before but it’s rare. The Moth often makes you scared, but it’s fun when you’re scared. It was a blast.”

“After the first start the breeze built from fresh to frightening,” said Irishman Dave Kenefick. “It’s the windiest I’ve ever sailed a Moth in and I’d prefer not to do it again, but I got through unscathed.”

 

 

The conditions exacted a toll on the fleet. There were broken masts, broken rudders and broken controls. Although unscathed, Kenefick wasn’t without problems.

“I had a big pitchpole just before the start of Race 1 and ripped the cleat for my ride-height control line right off the deck,” said Kenefick, who holds 13th place overall with 30 points. “I had to stop during the first upwind leg and tie the line off and I limped around the course for both races.”

Goodison didn’t suffer any breakdowns today but one of his main rivals, Iain Jensen of Australia, did. Jensen led Goodison around the first lap of Race 1, heightening the intrigue as to which of the veteran Mothists is faster.

On the second upwind leg, however, Jensen’s boom vang (the line that controls the height of the outboard end of the boom) broke. He managed to salvage a fifth in the race but then missed the second race because he returned to shore to make a repair in the hopes of returning for the third race. By that point the wind had increased and the race committee decided to postpone the rest of the day’s schedule.

 

 

“We had a good race going in the first one,” said Goodison of his duel with Jensen. “We were about the same at the first windward mark. I just got past him on the run and then had a bit of a splash down and he got past me at leeward gate. I didn’t see what happened to him on the next upwind leg, but after that I sailed pretty well.”

The course axis for both races was set at 330 degrees at a length of 1.1 nautical miles. In each race the fleet mostly took to the left side of the course. While it seemed like the water was flatter on that side, the decision to go left was out of a desire to minimise manoeuvers.

“When it’s so windy, the fewer tacks the better,” said Diaz de Leon, who holds fifth overall with 10 points. “People were mostly thinking start and go to the layline. It’s risky to tack because you don’t want to flip, and a lot of people were flipping.

“I felt good about my tacking today,” Diaz de Leon continued.” Most of my tacks were pretty nice and I think I made big gains. When you’re small you have to have good boathandling to go as fast as the big guys.”

Racing is scheduled to continue tomorrow with a forecast that calls for winds of 12 to 20 knots.

 

Day 1 video 

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=z6xmTnXBd5Y

 

More information at www.mothworlds.org/bermuda

Euroflex wins SuperFoiler Grand Prix Series

 

 

The final round of the five regatta series was held in Sydney over the weekend of 24 -25 March with Euroflex taking out the regatta, as well as the series and winning the inaugural Ben Lexcen Trophy. Tech2 was a close second, with Pavement third, followed by Record Point, iD intranet and Kleenmaid last.

Nathan Outteridge, Glenn Ashby from Euroflex, and Luke Parkinson from tech2 chatted with us about their success and the challenges of sailing the SuperFoiler.

YouTube video

https://www.youtube.com/watch?time_continue=2&v=XFcMUDwWMCg

 

 

Moth fleet set to ply Great Sound in Bermuda

 

 

 

2018 Bacardi Moth World Championship

 

An international fleet featuring the reigning two-time world champion Paul Goodison of the U.K. is set to contend the Bacardi Moth World Championship next week on Bermuda’s Great Sound.

Hosted by the Royal Bermuda Yacht Club and co-organized with the International Moth Class Association, the 77th running of the Moth Worlds is scheduled Mar. 26-Apr. 1. Prior to that the Bermuda Moth National Championship will be staged Mar. 23-24.

The Moth is a high-performance dinghy measuring 3.355m (11 feet) in length and 2.250m (7.3 feet) in beam. The hull weight ranges between 10-20kg (22-44 pounds) and it is equipped with hydrofoils that raise the hull out of the water in winds as light as 5 knots. The ideal windspeed is 8 to 12 knots, which enables the Moth to sail at 15 to 20 knots boatspeed. To watch a Moth sail past at 20 knots is to hear nothing but the sound of the wand that controls the ride height skipping off the wave tops.

Development in the class is largely open, meaning that the sailor can tinker with aspects such as the rig, hydrofoils, sail and fairleads. Sailors will spend hours determining the best lead for a control line so that it’s led to their fingertips while they’re hiking off the rack. Sailors have also been known to spend significant amounts of time redesigning the all-important hydrofoils, playing with the aspect ratio to induce more lift and reduce drag.

Paul Goodison, a member of the Artemis Racing Team for the America’s Cup last summer in Bermuda, won the Worlds last year in Italy and two years ago in Japan. He won the 2017 Worlds by a comfortable 20 points and the 2016 Worlds by a scant 3 points. Through the two victories Goodison has racked up seven race wins and 20 top-3 finishes in 24 starts.

He comes into the regatta as the decided favourite and hopes to lay waste to this year’s fleet with a new implement of destruction. Goodison took delivery of a new Kevin Ellway-designed Exocet Moth built by Maguire Boats of the U.K. at the end of January. He describes the boat as the same one with which he won the past two Worlds but with a potentially devastating development.

“It has a steeper wing bar in an effort to gain righting moment,” said Goodison. “It’s harder to sail because the angle of the bar is so steep that I’m not sliding across side-to-side like on the old boat. It’s more of an uphill/downhill action, but the benefit is more straight-line speed.”

Goodison has an added advantage in his bag of tricks: local knowledge. With Artemis Racing Goodison was a member of the weather team and he spent days on Bermuda’s Great Sound taking wind and current readings in the vicinity of where the Moth Worlds racecourse is expected to be set.

“It depends on where the race committee puts the racecourse, but I should know the area. I spent a lot of days out there,” said Goodison.

The international fleet of 45 entries includes Australians Iain Jensen and Tom Slingsby, who placed 3rd and 4th, respectively, at the 2017 Worlds, and Matt Struble of the U.S., who won the U.S. Nationals two weeks ago. The fleet counts 12 entries from Great Britain, eight from the United States and four each from Australia and Bermuda. Entries have also been received from Canada, France, Germany, Hong Kong, Ireland, Italy, Netherlands, Portugal and Switzerland. Eight sailors are racing for the Master’s title and there is one entry each for the Women’s and Youth divisions.

“The quality of the fleet is extremely high. There are some very good sailors here,” said James Doughty, President of the Bermuda Moth Class Association. “The invitationals a couple of years ago helped show the sailors how nice it is racing in Bermuda. Everyone enjoys the island and the conditions on the water.”

This is the first time that the Royal Bermuda Yacht Club has hosted the Moth Worlds. Previously it hosted Moth Invitationals in 2015 and 2016. The success of those regattas led to the Moth Class awarding the Worlds to the Royal Bermuda Yacht Club.

 

 

Locals light up Busselton leg to Ignite Championship Challenge

 

tech2 and Kleenmaid had a great round of the SuperFoiler Grand Prix in Busselton. – photo © Andrea Francolini

 

 

Two West Australian skippers have steered their teams to the podium in their home regatta with Perth’s Luke Parkinson (tech2) and Steve Thomas (Pavement) climbing onto the Busselton dais alongside Kleenmaid. tech2 secured a third victory of the regatta to claim the outright win by the slenderest of margins over Pavement.

“I loved the opportunity to be back sailing in WA over the weekend. We had a full range of conditions and this win puts us in great shape for the final in Sydney,” said Busselton’s victorious skipper Luke Parkinson – who thrust tech2 to the top for the very first time. 

“It has been a pleasure to sail in such a beautiful location, extremely tight racing it went all the way to the last run of the last race. I am really excited for the Grand Final in Sydney,” said tech2’s mainsheet hand Ayden Menzies.

In what was the most hotly contested regatta to date, Pavement finished four points behind in second.

“Pretty cool for WA to get on top at the home venue. I guess we had a lot of local knowledge,” said Pavement skipper and second on the podium Steve Thomas, “We were stoked to get second – it was a really close race between us and Kleenmaid.”

The regatta also witnessed the breakthrough podium for Olivia Price, Harry Morton and Josh McKnight – who missed out on claiming overall points by just one win. “As a team we’ve been playing the long game, slowly developing our techniques with Sydney being the end goal so this was a really important regatta for us to peak at,” said Kleenmaid mainsheet hand Josh McKnight.

The wash-up is Euroflex’s stranglehold on the championship has slipped after her last placed finish, although her star crew of Nathan Outteridge, Iain Jensen and Glenn Ashby still hold a two-point lead over tech2. It sets up a thrilling climax to the opening series with the Expr3ss! SuperFoiler Grand Final – Sydney from 23 to 25 March, 2018, to decide the first winner of the Ben Lexcen Trophy.

 

Championship Standings

Euroflex – 19 pts

Tech2 – 17 pts

Pavement – 16 pts

Record Point – 12 pts

iD Intranet – 11 pts

Kleenmaid  – 10 pts

 

Test of the wing sail for the AC75 rig

 

 

Graphic of double luffed AC75 mainsail © Bella Mente Quantum Racing

 

A small development team of Emirates Team New Zealand’s designers, shore crew and sailors, supported by Luna Rossa, North Sails and Southern Spars, have been busy developing a prototype soft wing sail and rig to be part of the AC75 class of boat to be sailed for the 36th America’s Cup in 2021.

The concept was first unveiled by Bella Mente Quantum Racing’s Terry Hutchinson during a US Sailing Leadership Forum held on February 4. Hutchinson showed a graphic with the D-shaped, square backed spar supporting two mainsails each with its own track.

It is an attempt to get the some of the benefits of a wingsail, without the need to lift the entire rig out of the boat.

The big gain is not in performance but in handling the cranky AC75’s which will have minimal stability when at rest.

The rig will enable the AC75’s to be towed in a conventional way and not using the process known as ‘sideslipping’ in the AC50’s – where in any moderate breeze or above the chase boat was strapped bow to stern with the AC50 to get the foiling catamaran back to base.

Sideslipping was required on any tow that was not into the wind, as on reaching or downwind tows the wingsail could not be feathered and would power up, taking charge of the AC50 and its chase boat.

It is a very slow process and was necessary in Bermuda in most situations to get the AC50’s back to the dock once they had entered the Royal Dockyard – requiring the 300 metres Dockyard to be closed to all other traffic to allow the AC50’s to be “tacked” into their berth by the support crews and chase boats. The process could take up to 20 minutes depending on the wind angle and strength.

The downside of the concept is the bulk contained in the double sail, which will make interesting handling by the crew. (Remembering that the sail below is only on a relatively small trimaran and not an AC75, with a mainsail luff length about three times the length of the test boat in the video.)

 

See video here:

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=IijmMB3GWic

 

 

Emirates Team NZ reported the test in social media:

“Although we have been working collectively and quietly developing this concept since last year, it is not a huge secret in terms of what we are doing because the intention is to have a tested rig and sail concept that will become part of the AC75 class rule.” said Project Co-ordinator Steve Collie.

“We have been developing this concept towards the class rule in Auckland with representation of the Challenger of Record, Luna Rossa’s designers here as part of the testing process.

The objective of the testing in Auckland is to validate a concept which the Emirates Team New Zealand designers have found to be promising in initial simulations. North Sails and veteran America’s Cup sail designer Burns Fallow has been a key part of the process from the beginning.”

“We started off back in August with a clean sheet of paper and some ideas and came up with this mainsail concept.”

“We have done enough work on it in simulation to know that it is a fast concept, but you have got to do the basic things like tack and gybe, and make the thing go up and down and just little things like that before you commit to this for the next three years.”

The concept being tested currently has a large ‘D’ shaped section mast, developed and built by Southern Spars, with separate mainsails on either side of the mast providing a smooth transition from the mast to sail in its aerodynamic shape.

“In addition to conventional mainsail trimming controls, this concept allows for twist and camber control at the head of the mainsail through a control arm on top of the rig which will be very interesting for us sailors especially transitioning back from the AC50 hard wing sails.” said Glenn Ashby.

While the hard wing sails of the AC50’s were extremely efficient, they required 20 people to launch and retrieve the wing before and after each day’s sailing.

“We want something where teams can take the mainsail down and leave the rig in at the dock as well as potentially make mainsail changes on the water, but have something that aerodynamically is superior to a conventional mainsail without being heavier.” explained Collie.

“Essentially we are looking for a new advancement in mainsail technology that we would like to think can trickle down to other boats.”

As with all America’s Cup class developments weight is always a big issue, but especially so with the AC75’s because of their self righting ability it is important to keep weight aloft to a minimum.

After a handful of days testing the roughly 1/3 scale model on Auckland Harbour the initial tests proved pretty positive for all parties involved in the project.

“To see it in reality, even in the small scale it’s a big step in our confidence, that this thing is something a bit different and should be pretty good.” concluded Fallow.

“Obviously this is a very early concept and test, but the main purpose is validate that our thinking is heading in a realistic direction. It’s huge step towards the finalisation of the class rule which is due to be released on March 31st.” said Ashby

As published in Sail-World NZ, 25 February, 2018

 

 

Kiwi youth foiling winners crowned in Auckland

Isaac McHardie and William McKenzie win the Red Bull

 

Red Bull Youth Generation Championships in Auckland

 

In the City of Sails on February 23-25, New Zealand’s most talented youth sailors delivered thrilling action at the first 2018 stop of Red Bull Foiling Generation – the innovative series created by two-time Olympic champions Roman Hagara and Hans Peter Steinacher. Isaac McHardie and William McKenzie triumphed to claim the national championship and will go on to compete in the World Final this November.

 

Reigning Red Bull Foiling Generation World Champions Olivia Mackay and Micah Wilkinson had claimed the global title for New Zealand in 2016, and with the pair now over the 16-20 age category, anticipation was high to find the Kiwi sailors who will defend the title. Sixteen teams vied for the honour, flying on their foils across Waitematā Harbour. When two days of intense racing concluded on Sunday, McHardie and McKenzie emerged as the class of the field to top the podium. The new national champions will take on an international line-up in the Red Bull Foiling Generation World Final at Miami, USA, on November 16-18, 2018.

“We are absolutely pumped to come away with the win!” says Isaac McHardie. “Unfortunately we didn’t get to race today but we’re really looking forward to Miami and we’re going to give it our all.” 

Today’s light wind conditions meant Auckland unfortunately did not see Semi-Final or Final races being able to be completed, therefore the winners were selected from the 11th heat race concluded on Saturday. This heat was decided on the final downwind leg – Jackson Keon & Tom Fyfe who had lead the entire race found themselves looking over their shoulders, as Isaac McHardie & William McKenzie came hard at them, getting to the final mark by a small margin, and sailing on to win the race.

“New Zealand has a passion for sailing, and people recognise that participating in this series can be a step toward a career in the sport,” said Hagara. “Since Olivia and Micah won the World Final in 2016, she has helmed a wildcard boat in the Extreme Sailing Series, and he sailed in the Red Bull Youth America’s Cup. Plus at least 40 previous participants in Red Bull Foiling Generation are currently in Olympic-class programs for Tokyo 2020.”

Hagara and Steinacher first launched Red Bull Foiling Generation in 2015 to find the world’s most talented young sailors and introduce them to the type of cutting-edge foiling technology used in the America’s Cup. Both males and females participate in two-person teams and race in four-boat heats on Flying Phantom foiling catamarans. After regattas in France and New Zealand, four stops remain to determine national champions in the Netherlands, Switzerland, Austria and the USA before the World Final.

“I think the World Final is going to be even more competitive this year because sailors are more professional Steinacher commented. “When you watch young sailors like these athletes in New Zealand, you’re seeing the future of the sport, and that’s what Red Bull Foiling Generation is all about.

Next up: The foils will fly in the Netherlands, when Red Bull Foiling Generation sets sail in The Hague on June 28-30, 2018.

Back to find future foiling stars

 

 

 

Red Bull Foiling Generation Regatta in Auckland  – Feb 23 – 25

 

The brainchild of double Olympic champions Roman Hagara and Hans Peter Steinacher, Red Bull Foiling Generation seeks the world’s best young sailors to learn and compete in the next wave of sailing: high-speed foiling catamarans. The champions crowned in France, New Zealand, the Netherlands, Switzerland, Austria and the USA will go on to represent their countries in November’s World Final in Miami, USA.

After getting off to a flying start in 2015 and 2016, Red Bull Foiling Generation is back to discover the globes top youth sailors. Developed by sports directors Roman Hagara and Hans Peter Steinacher, the series gives wings to talented sailors aged 16-20 by introducing them to the type of cutting-edge foiling technology used in the last America’s Cup.

Auckland’s Waitematā Harbour will host the second stop of the 2017/2018 World Series, being held this Friday, Saturday and Sunday (Feb 23 – 25) at the Royal New Zealand Yacht Squadron.

RNZYS Youth Training Programme and RNZYS Performance Programme sailors competing include: Nick Egnot-Johnson, Josh Wijohn, Taylor Balogh, James Wilson, Jordan Stevenson, Celia Willison, Charlotte Porter, George Angus and Mitch Jackson.

Olivia Mackay from Auckland, helmed New Zealand to win the Red Bull Foiling Generation World Final in 2016 and has gone on to helm a wildcard boat in the Extreme Sailing Series, and at least 40 previous participants of Foiling Generation are currently in Olympic-class programs for Tokyo 2020.

This week, a new crop of future New Zealand sailing stars have their own chance to shine. Mackay will play coach on-site to New Zealand’s 2018 competitors.

“Phantoms are like no other boat, high paced and loose, it was two of the best regattas I’ve ever competed in.”  says Olivia Mackay.

“Getting the opportunity at a world final is always a fun challenge, but in these boats, with this style of racing, it was an absolutely epic experience and a great feeling to represent NZ.”

The City of Sails will see 16 teams of two undergo the Qualification Rounds this Friday Feb 23, followed by Repechage Rounds on Saturday and the Semi Finals and Finals on Sunday.

At each of the national championship events, Red Bull Foiling Generation provides the boats and expert coaching. Each team will race the innovative Flying Phantom, a spectacular multihull catamaran capable of reaching speeds up to 35 knots (nearly 40mph).

All participants gain invaluable experience, as they are coached by Steinacher and Hagara in taking on the demanding challenge of foiling. The Austrian legends are also the masterminds behind the Red Bull Youth America’s Cup, where victorious skipper Peter Burling learned skills that helped him to win the 2017 America’s Cup at the helm of Emirates Team New Zealand.

“I always say that it’s like in motorsport: young people start in karts and they keep moving up toward Formula 1,” Hagara explains. “We want to give these sailors a chance to showcase their skills.”

 

view video teaser here:

https://www.redbull.com/nz-en/videos/Red-Bull-Foiling-Generation-2018-Teaser

 

Race Schedule

Friday Feb 23 – Qualification Rounds
Saturday Feb 24 – Repechage Rounds
Sunday Feb 25 – Semi Finals & Finals

Red Bull Foiling Generation Race Calendar

The race calendar continues in 2018, for a total of six global stops before the climax of November’s World Final: held in Miami, Florida, USA.

25 – 27 October 2017 – La Baule, France
23 – 25 February 2018 – Auckland, New Zealand
29 June – 1 July 2018 – The Hague, Netherlands
13 – 15 July 2018 – Geneva, Switzerland
10 – 12 August 2018 – Achensee, Austria
9 – 11 November 2018 – Miami, Florida, USA
16 – 18 November 2018 – World Final, Miami, Florida, USA

 

iD upset Euroflex’s winning run at Gold Coast Regatta

 

SuperFoilers Grand Prix on the Gold Coast, Australia

 

America’s Cup sailor Paul Campbell-James has shown that Eurfolex isn’t invincible, with his star international crew aboard iD Intranet taking race seven off the series leader at the SuperFoiler Grand Prix’s final day of racing on the Gold Coast.

“It’s bloody nice to take the victory off them and to overtake Euroflex was pretty cool. We clocked 35k knots in that first run and it feels great to end what wasn’t the greatest of weekends for us with a race victory,” said the British skipper after his iD Intranet team became just the second SuperFoiler to claim a victory in the inaugural circuit.

 

 

Paul Campbell-James’ countryman and America’s Cup teammate Ed Powys also pleased his team was able to snatch a win off Euroflex.

“It was more of a relief to be out there racing without dramas and it was a good first race to win,” said iD’s bowman, We are trying to get back some momentum. We ground to a halt for a while and hopefully we are over the worst of it now and we can go sailing again.”

 

 

Although the iD crew didn’t have the satisfaction of crossing the line first, given the race was called off and current placings became the result after tech2 became entwined with a marker.

“We were mid capsize and as we landed we hooked our rudder. It was a schoolboy error and we will take full responsibility for that,” said tech2’s Aiden Menzies.

Astonishingly tech2, who was in second at the time of the incident, she caused, was awarded the second-place points – giving them ten from the race and drawing the ire of her challengers.

 

 

“It’s not fair, if you cause the race to get suspended you should be disqualified – I will have to have a word to Parko [Luke Parkinson] about that,” said Pavement’s skipper Steve Thomas.

“I can understand other boats would be annoyed but we were just sailing within the rules. I’m sure all the skippers will discuss that, that’s the great thing about this class,” said Aiden Menzies, tech2’s Mainsheet Hand.

 

 

That decision ultimately proved crucial with tech2 holding onto second position on the regatta podium, although their bowman Sam Newton had even higher aspirations for Gold Coast event, “It’s a pity we didn’t get three races in today, I feel like we could have won the regatta,” said the America’s Cup winner.

Series front-runner Euroflex finished last in the penultimate race of the double points Sunday Supercharge after touching down at speed early in the contest but went on to secure a win in the final race to celebrate her third straight regatta triumph.

 

 

“We made a couple of mistakes but at the end of the day no one was seriously hurt. I’ve fallen off a couple of things but at the end of the day I’ve got a couple of bruises but I’m okay,” said Glenn Ashby after his team’s record of 21 race wins came to an end.

 

 

Gold Coast SuperFoiler standings:

Euroflex – 50 points

tech2 – 42 points

Record Point – 36 points

iD Intranet – 31points

Pavement – 26 points

Kleenmaid – 24 points

 

 

Euroflex leads the overall race for the Ben Lexcen trophy by seven points ahead of tech2 and Pavement.

 

Racing now journeys to the West Coast of Australia with Busselton hosting.

 

Miami Foiling Week – February 15 – 18 at Biscayne Bay

 

 

It has been two years since Foiling Week, the epicentre of hydrofoil innovation, broke its own mould and held the first non-European event in Newport, RI. Designs first announced there are now full-production foilers and making history at professional sailing series around the planet.

And Foiling Week and its Gurit Forum of round-table topical explorations has become even more globalised, with last month’s Sydney Foiling Week. There the leaders in the hydrofoil space, including America’s Cup-winning skipper Glenn Ashby, shared with the world their innovative and collaborative spirit.

This week in Miami, thirteen speakers, including sailors (two-time Moth World Champion Paul Goodison), designers (Nacra 17 designer Pete Melvin) and builders (Fast Forward Carbon’s Tommy Gonzales), will represent latest in foiling developments.

The fantastic waterfront facilities of Shake-A-Leg along the pristine waters of Biscayne Bay will play host to both the forum and what every participant looks forward to: the demonstrations/trials, regatta and distance race. The on-water program will be second to none where every age and sailor-type gets to explore, test and share the excitement of foiling above the water.

 

 

And as Foiling week grows, so does its international community that is working to expand hydrofoil innovation into new realms where it can better lives and improve efficiencies in sport and transportation.

“Foiling requires stakeholders to meet and discuss innovation and hot topics,” said Luca Rizzotti, founder of Foiling Week and Gurit Forum. “We have come so far since 2014 and it’s important that this community of highly intelligent people have a place to gather and share and collaborate.”

Rizzotti said he is already seeing the fruit of the Forum’s efforts with safety initiatives being executed at international events, sustainability proposals shared across manufacturers and events, and accessibility issues for women, children and disabled sailors being addressed with new designs.

 

Community Based

Wherever Foiling Week goes, the local sailors, designers and builders come out in force. Like a Pied Piper, people come out of the woodwork to follow and take part in the event. This will be no different in Miami.

Miami is home of the US Sailing Team, and members of the foiling Olympic Nacra 17 squad will be floating in and out of Foiling Week. Also, visionary filmmaker Patrick Rynne, founder of the Waterlust Project, who explores the ocean through the lenses of lifestyle, environment, innovation and social responsibility, lives in Miami and will be visiting the Gurit Forum and trial events.

Even legendary innovator Greg Ketterman, inventor of the Ketterman Tri-Foiler in the 1990s, will be at the Forum to give perspective in how far foiling devekopments have come and some insight into the future.

Most importantly, anyone in the area is encouraged to come to Shake-A-Leg to share their own creations and even test them at the on-water trials. Or just come to try out foiling for the first time.

Like in Newport, America’s best are flying into Miami to share the projects that most excite them.  David Clark, founder of Fulcrum Speedworks, will be offering demos on the production UFO foiler. And George Hradil of Delta Hydrofoil, a leader in the manufacturing of kite foils, will be sharing his findings as he pushes the  design/build envelope.

There is also an international contingent coming to Miami. Louise Chevallier and Karl Blouin from Canada will be discussing the latest developments in the C-Class catamaran. And Sean Baldwin will share plans for Foil Baddeck 2019, a hydrofoil event in the Canadian Maritimes celebrating the innovations of Alexander Graham Bell.

 

Gurit Forum

The 2017 Gurit Forum in Lake Garda focused on the three tenants of Foiling Week: Safety, Sustainability and Accessibility. In Miami, the two-part Forum, a round-table, open and relaxed discussion with panelists and heavy audience participation, will dig deeper into the safety considerations in design and race formats. As boats fly faster, sailors must adapt and sometimes the learning curve becomes dangerous.

In addition to safety, the second forum topic will be about the branding of foiling. Like an new and growing space, today’s innovators, sailors, designers and builders, have a disproportionately high influence on how this segment of the sport is presented and perceived in the world. This discussion will explore how much control we have over the development of foiling from a community perspective.

 

Miami Foiling Week program:

From February 15th to 18th, 2018 at Shake-A-Leg Miami.

 

Thursday, February 15th

Practice race, Foiling Trials

6:00 pm to 8:00 pm free Bacardi bar

 

Friday, February 16th

Gurit Forum, Harken Kids Trials, Long distance Race

from 7:30 pm Foiling Week Party

 

Saturday, February 17th

Gurit Forum, Harken Kids Trials, Course racing, Foiling Coaching

from 7:30 pm dinner party at Adventure Sports in Cocunut Grove

 

Sunday, February 18th

Foiling Trials, Course racing, Foiling Coaching

late afternoon prizegiving with free Bacardi bar

 

More info via: foilingweek.com/miami-2018/